Norwegian units and uniforms 1810-1814

 
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Prussian Landwehr
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2015 3:10 pm    Post subject: Norwegian units and uniforms 1810-1814

Warning this is a long one!

Edited 1:

Added the units Roles in game.

Edit 2 more info on the Norwegian army.

The Norwegian army in 1814 were of 36 000 men and more than 120 gunboats and 10 sloops in total during the Dano-Swedish war in 1808.

Divided up the army mustered: 24 Dragoon companies total of 1800 men, 14 Musketeer companies (each with 4 divisions) total of 8400 men, 10 reserve Musketeer companies (each with 3-4 Divisions) of total 5000 men, 10 sharpshooter companies of total 1200 men, 8 Grenadier Battalions (each with 4 divisions) of total 4800 men, 6 Fortress Artillery batteries of 300 men, 3 filed artillery batteries (2 mounted) of 300 men, 2 Ski Battalions (each with 3 companies) of total 600 men, 2 Jaeger Battalions (each with 4 companies each) of 1200 men.

Infantry:

The Norwegian infantry were splited into 5 different types; Line infantry, Grenadiers, Skiitroops, Jaegers and Sharpshooters.

The line infantry (Linje Infanteri):
Regular troops in the Norwegian army that were using flintlock muskets and ring bayonet. The uniform were bright red jackets with folds and collar in white colors, the pants were dark grey, same were the knee boots. the shako were black with yellow and red ropes and white feather. White leather straps.

Ingame the Linje Infanteri would fill the role of Standard Musketeer with bit different stats, lower attack but higher HP. Cost bit higher than musketeer.



Grenadiers (Grenaderer):
Elite troops in the Norwegian army Armed with flintlock musket, bayonet, Sabre and of course grenades. It were common to see the Grenadiers line up with the Line infantry to boost the moral, but did also form their own regiments. The uniform of the Grenadiers were Bright red jackets with fold and collar of regimental color, blue pants, grey knee boots. The helmet were of bearskin with bronze sign in front, while leather straps.

Standard Grenadiers ingame.



Jaeger / Light infantry (Jeger):
Elite troops that were armed with flintlock rifles and Hirschfenger (a straight sabre that could be mounted as an bayonet on the rifle). they were used as harassment towards enemy Line formations, and other skirmishes. the uniform were Green jacket with black brim and folds, Grey pants and black boots. Black shako with green rope and pom-pom. Black leather straps.

Light infantry with high attack, low HP and good mobility, best used against heavy infantry and Ranged Cavalry.



Ski Troops (Skiløpere):
Specialized Jaeger troops that were unique for Norway. The ski equipment were of today's standard primitive, one staff, long wooden skis and fur coats to keep them warm. During the summer they were deployed as Jaeger units, They were equipped with short barreled rifles and a skisabre, There were other weapons than the standard rifle, blunderbuss were also commons sight on the battlefield in the hands of the skitroops as a close combat weapon. The uniform were dark grey with green brim and folds, black scarf with white edge. Dark grey pants and black boots.Black top hat with Green feather and rope in front. Black leather straps with yellow buckles.

Fast light infantry with Carbines and not normal Rifles as normal jaegers, bit higher HP than Jaegers with bonuses towards Light infantry and melee cavalry. Has ability to hide with the loss of speed, not able to fire in this mode.



Sharpshooters (Skarpskyttere):
Crack troops of the Norwegian army that were deployed with the Jaegers. They were Armed with Flintlock muskets instead of rifles, with unique adjustable rear sights and also had bayonets for close combat. The uniforms were same as the Jeagers.

Light infantry with low HP, Long range high damage attack, good mobility. Has the crackshot ability. Bonuses towards light and heavy infantry. Cost 3 pop.

Cavalry:

Cavalry of the Norwegian army were mostly divided into 2 types; Dragoons and mounted Jaegers.

Norwegian Dragoons (Dragoner):
The Dragoons were the mainstay of the Norwegian cavalry and were armed with Flintlock Cabins, straight sabre, and one or two flintlock pistols. The uniform were bright red jacket with white or yellow folds and collar. Pants grey pants with white buttons on the side, normal dragoon helmet with horsehair and white feather on the left side. White leather straps. 1 bandoleer for ammunition and an other as strap for the carbine. Red saddle cover with white edges.

Standard Dragoons.



Mounted Jaegers (Ridene Jegere):
The Mounted Jaegers were armed in the same way as Dragons, carbine, straight sabre and one or two pistols. The uniform is the same as jaegers, Green jacket, grey pants with green buttons on the side, black shako with green rope and pom-pom. black boots and leather straps.

Fast light cavalry, Low HP, medium attack, long range. Good against artillery and light cavalry.



Artillery:

The Norwegian artillery were divided into 3 sections; Garrison artillery, siege artillery and field artillery and the infantry also had it own guns.

In our case ill focus on the field artillery, they fielded 3, 6 and 12 pound guns, standard for the time. In the company they had also mounted artillery for fast deployments, but were expensive to operate. The guns were colored bright red on the wood and metal straps that kept the canons in place on the frame.
The uniforms of the troops that were operating the cannons were Red jacket with dark blue brims and folds, yellow buttons. White skirts under and grey pants. Shakot with blue ropes. white leather straps and were armed with a single sabre.
The horses had were red saddle cover with blue edges.

Standard artillery.



Militia:
THe norwegian militia were spited into several types; Militia, mounted militia, mounted millitia artilery.

Militia (Hjemmeværn):
The normal Millita were normal townsfolk that were organized into town guards and were armed with flintlock muskets and often had uniforms of the city they were in, mostly grey and red.

Militia spawned from town center with a timed life. Higher life than normal Militia type of units.

Mounted Militia (Ridene Borgergarde):
they were mounted honor guards during royal visits and were of the city's best men that were not in the army. They had similar uniforms to the normal militia, but were armed with sabre and pistols.

Light melee Cavalry with medium HP, low attack and high speed. good against villagers and buildings.


Mounted Militia Artillery (Christiania Frivillige Ridende Artillerikorps):
The 68 man big artillery corp were the only militia manned artillery corp that were actually in battle, and had 1 pounds amusettes, over sized rifles mounted on a carriage that were transported by a single horse. The guns were light and highly mobile with the weight of only 100 kilos in total. All the members of the corp were mounted on horseback.

Fast artillery unit, with high rate of fire low attack, good against cavalry. fast deployment.
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Prussian Landwehr
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2015 11:56 pm    Post subject:

Naval units:

The Danish-Norwegian fleet were one of the biggest in Europe before the Napoleonic war broke out. Most of the flotilla were harbored in Copenhagen, some of the smaller ships were spread out along the Norwegian coastline as coastguard. They mostly Sloops and Gunboats, but a frigate were not uncommon sight in the largest Norwegian ports.

Gunboats:
gunboats were not more than large rowboats with a small mast for a sail with a 24 pound cannon in bow and stern. Some variants were mounted with 100 pound mortar.

Small and agile ships, with a forward mounted cannon, Weak hull and attack. no special salvos. Can be mass produced. Max pop of 20. Produced in the Dock and shipments, in a card called Gunboat Warfare.



Sloops:
Replaces the Carrack in the Danish-Norwegian fleet, fast ship with 3 guns on each side. Were normally used as a coastal patrol ship, with 1 mast middle of the ship, with triangle sails in the bow and a square on the aft.

Fast and agile ships Lower HP than a Carrack but faster, Same damage, but no broadside. Can fish.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2015 4:54 pm    Post subject:

Hey rewenger, thanks for the announced and informative posting!

I'd take too long to address every item that you posted, so I'll answer in a more general way and tell what conclusions I can draw and what possibilities I see from your posting.

#Norwegian Army
So, just by seeing the relations of numbers and troop types within the Norwegian army you can already see it had a surprisingly high amount of Sharpshooters and the just 600 men in the ski batallions indicate their elite status in my eyes. The other relations are quite ordinary, the only notable characteristics being the low numbers of designated Jaegers (largely compensated by the Sharpshooters and Ski Troopers though) and cavalry (usually between quarter or half of the infantry). The absence of heavy cavalry does not surprise me considering it's the army of a small state.

#Navy
Both ships were in history common ships, only the gunboat is characteristic (at least to some extent) for the Danish-Norwegian navy. That's why this unit is going to be a unique danish boat.

#Cavalry
Is already covered by the Danish army to large extent. The royal upgrade for Dragoons are going to be the popular Jütland/Jylland Dragoons. I don't see a difference in the design of Norwegian and Danish Dragoons that's worth highlighting. As for Mounted Jaegers, these are going to be featured as a shared unit.

#Infantry
As I said in the beginning, I find the light infantry units, including Sharpshooters and Ski Troopers, the most interesting units here as representative Norwegian units within the Danish-Norwegian civ. With the knowledge I have about other European armies of that time and their uniforms the rest seems pretty standard to me. I see that you tried to provide suggestions for boni. Thank you for this, but I'd like you to understand that there are already design constraints within the Danish civ that I need to respect. Could you please tell me in that regard the correct singular and plural of Skiløpere (please for "Ski Trooper", not "Ski Troop") and Skarpskyttere? I assume Skiløper and Skarpskytter.. ? Always need the names of the single units in correct Norwegian. Smile

#Militia
On a final note, some of these militia troops might be interesting as well. Could you provide some examples for the town uniforms of the Hjemmeværn and Ridene Borgergarde?

Also, do you know about any units that played an important role during the Norwegian uprising against the Swedes in the Napoleonic Era?
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Prussian Landwehr
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2015 12:38 am    Post subject:

Tilanus Commodor wrote:
Hey rewenger, thanks for the announced and informative posting!

I'd take too long to address every item that you posted, so I'll answer in a more general way and tell what conclusions I can draw and what possibilities I see from your posting.


#Norwegian Army
So, just by seeing the relations of numbers and troop types within the Norwegian army you can already see it had a surprisingly high amount of Sharpshooters and the just 600 men in the ski batallions indicate their elite status in my eyes. The other relations are quite ordinary, the only notable characteristics being the low numbers of designated Jaegers (largely compensated by the Sharpshooters and Ski Troopers though) and cavalry (usually between quarter or half of the infantry). The absence of heavy cavalry does not surprise me considering it's the army of a small state.


#Navy
Both ships were in history common ships, only the gunboat is characteristic (at least to some extent) for the Danish-Norwegian navy. That's why this unit is going to be a unique danish boat.


The Danish navy were the only nation that i have read about that used the gunboats to that wide extent. The reason behind that were the Gunboat war that were between 1801 and 1814, that started with the alliance between Denmark and France, and the siege of Copenhagen. The result of the siege resulted with burning of the entire fleet that were in harbor of Copenhagen. With the lack of larger ships, the danish used smaller crafts to protect is waters.

Tilanus Commodor wrote:

#Cavalry
Is already covered by the Danish army to large extent. The royal upgrade for Dragoons are going to be the popular Jütland/Jylland Dragoons. I don't see a difference in the design of Norwegian and Danish Dragoons that's worth highlighting. As for Mounted Jaegers, these are going to be featured as a shared unit.


I agree that the Norwegian Dragoon does not stand out in any way in compare to the Jylland Dragoon, just added it to the list since it were represented in the Norwegian army in that time period.

Tilanus Commodor wrote:

#Infantry
As I said in the beginning, I find the light infantry units, including Sharpshooters and Ski Troopers, the most interesting units here as representative Norwegian units within the Danish-Norwegian civ. With the knowledge I have about other European armies of that time and their uniforms the rest seems pretty standard to me. I see that you tried to provide suggestions for boni. Thank you for this, but I'd like you to understand that there are already design constraints within the Danish civ that I need to respect. Could you please tell me in that regard the correct singular and plural of Skiløpere (please for "Ski Trooper", not "Ski Troop") and Skarpskyttere? I assume Skiløper and Skarpskytter.. ? Always need the names of the single units in correct Norwegian. Smile


i totally understand youre choices with the bonis for units, just trowed out some ideas Smile Youre right with the singular naming of the units; "Skiløper" and "Skarpskytter".

Tilanus Commodor wrote:

#Militia
On a final note, some of these militia troops might be interesting as well. Could you provide some examples for the town uniforms of the Hjemmeværn and Ridene Borgergarde?


"Hjemmeværnet" or Home guard in English, were divided up in 2 divisions, the first were the common Citizens, bakers, traders, craftsmen etc, that were dressed up and drilled in the same fashion as regular troops, even though they were stationed as town guards. The second division were the remainder of the men that were not part of the first division, they had no formal training with the exception they were given during wartime, and were poorly armed and had no common uniform, they were dressed up as regular townsfolk for the age.

The uniform of "Bergen Ridende Borgergarde":


Example of "Stavanger Ridende Borgergarde":


Drammen, Oslo, Kongsberg and Stavanger all had Ridende borgergarde in green uniform in similar fashion, so the Bergen were the only one that had different color.

Tilanus Commodor wrote:

Also, do you know about any units that played an important role during the Norwegian uprising against the Swedes in the Napoleonic Era?


Not sure what you mean with uprising during the Napoleonic war, the war between Sweden and norway between 1808 and 1809 were more or less forced upon both parts by their allies, the French and the English. The war itself between the parts ended in status quo, and no territory gained in the conflict. And the battles were mostly border skirmish between the forces of the nations, most men in total were up to 1600 men on each side, with barely any causalities. No Norwegian regiment did stand out form the rest during the conflict.

The result of the Napoleonic war itself ended with the swedes had go give away territories of Finland to the Russians and gain Norway as a compensation for that, Danes lost Norway and gain the island of Anholt in the treaty of Kiel. Norway did agree to this treaty, even though nationalism started to bloom and gain our own constitution in 1814, and broke loose from Sweden in 1905.
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2015 11:22 am    Post subject:

Card idea for the jaegers for the danish army:

Mountain Jaegers of Røros:
bonus towards buildings.

Background story:

the jaeger company stationed in Røros; prox 400 men strong part of the northern Norwegian army were to blow up the copper mines of the town if the Swedish were to invade the town.

Copper mines of Røros:
faster mining.
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Prussian Landwehr
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2016 10:18 pm    Post subject:

Info Links to more on the Norwegian army:

NB! In Norwegian!

Uniforms:
http://www.nb.no/nbsok/nb/688cc5dee29c3f662da276a7b9bfa57d#37

Troop types:
http://dsfmc.no/cms/index.php?page=troppetyper-uniformering-og-utstyr-1808---1814

Equipment:
http://dsfmc.no/cms/index.php?page=soldatens-personlige-utstyr

Other uniform site:
http://dsfmc.no/cms/index.php?page=uniformer

Militia:
http://dsfmc.no/cms/index.php?page=borgervapning
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 1:08 pm    Post subject:

Suddenly there seems to be widespread interest in the Scandinavian theatre!

A small point of order: - in the case of the Danish and Norwegian forces, the 1-pdr 'amusetter' were not "over sized rifles mounted on a carriage" but small, smooth-bore field pieces, which seem to have been surprisingly effective even though the carriage and gun mounts had a tendencey to fall apart in the field. It seems they were generall pulled by two horses, or three men if situation demanded (See below).

Amusette, it seems was a term with many meanings. The amusette as oversized musket (aka 'wall gun') was used by German jagers and Queen's Rangers in America. (It seems various forms of portable support were favoured over a wheeled carriage- which was Marechal de Saxe's proposition).

There is very useful article (in Norwegian) at the site that you mentioned, here:
http://dsfmc.no/cms/index.php?page=amusetten

with some good illustrations.

Useful links here, too:
http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=165367

Here are photos of the Norwegian 1-pdr captured at Berby, kept in a backroom somewhere in the Armeemuseum in Stockholm.

http://digitaltmuseum.se/011024265642?query=1-pundig%20amusett&pos=2#&gid=1&pid=1
http://digitaltmuseum.se/011024472270?query=1-pundig%20amusett&pos=0#&gid=1&pid=1

Regards
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 1:31 pm    Post subject:

Hey jf42, thanks for your posting. What you call Amusette seems to correspond with historical falconets (don't mistake the AoE3 guns as true falconets) and as you said, wall guns. I highly doubt "wall guns" were used by Jaegers. Jaegers used hunting rifles, which were shorter than muskets, but more precise. Long guns were also unsuitable for operating in narrow forests. Jaegers were - in the beginning - often attached to regular line infantry which also had a few field pieces available to them. That seems for me to be the only plausible link. Small cannon barrels (no matters how small) being carried without gun carriages by agile Jaegers through the woods seems absurd though.

AoE3 already has an artillery unit called "Horse Artillery", whose gun roughly fits the caliber seen in the illustrations and of course the fact that it was pulled by horses (therefore the name), which make it "field artillery". The Swedish made agile field artillery popular.

So, what is your suggestion? An Amusette unit of some kind? Smile
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 3:26 pm    Post subject:

Tilanus Commodor wrote:
What you call Amusette seems to correspond with historical falconets (don't mistake the AoE3 guns as true falconets) and as you said, wall guns.


Tilanus, greetings. This is not an area in which I profess any expertise. However, I have been involved in some intensive study recently and am newly returned from the Royal Artillery Museum in Woolwich. It is definitely my impression that one nuance of the term amusette, is a long-barrelled, light calibre smoothbore 'piece' used for 'sniping' at specific targets at long range, and that this was also the later meaning of the term 'falconet.'.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barryslemmings/213116082

I am also sure that the German light troops in British service during the American War are commonly believed to have carried a large calibre, smoothbore musket, referred to in sources as an amusette, which was effectively a wall-gun used in field operations.

http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=408918

https://www.perry-miniatures.com/product_info.php?products_id=1609

Tilanus Commodor wrote:
I highly doubt "wall guns" were used by Jaegers. Jaegers used hunting rifles, which were shorter than muskets, but more precise. Long guns were also unsuitable for operating in narrow forests. Jaegers were - in the beginning - often attached to regular line infantry which also had a few field pieces available to them. That seems for me to be the only plausible link. Small cannon barrels (no matters how small) being carried without gun carriages by agile Jaegers through the woods seems absurd though.


There is a degree of uncertainty as to how much service the amusette saw in America, how it was employed and how effective it might have been. However, there is evidence it was used as an area weapon by jagers to flush out enemy troops from cover, exposing them to rifle fire from the rest of the jager company. You will find plenty of discussion of this on the www. e.g. -
[2015] Field use of amusettes
http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=388788

[2014]Prussian [he means Hanoverian] Amusette Light Field Artillery
http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=351401

[2013] “Big Shots – Amusettes, Jingals and Other ..."
http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=322606

[2012]Fife & Drum Amusette - Painted Pix
http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=289661

[2012] “Amusettes"
http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=267297

[2010] ""Amusettes" in 25/28mm?"
http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=212578

The situation is a little confusing since, broadly speaking, during the same period in Europe, the Hessians used the term amusette to refer instead to a very light field field piece, 1- 1 1/2-pdr, mounted on a carriage fitted with twin spars instead of a conventional trail, which served either as shafts to which a horse could be harnessed or as handles for troops to draw the piece by hand.

Hessian officers employed by the Kingdom of Denmark appear to have introduced the term to Danish service and amusette is the term we find used for the light 1-pdrs in service from as early as 1758 and in the wars with Sweden they were still using an amusette carriage designed by the Hessian general von Huth. (See: http://dsfmc.no/cms/index.php?page=amusetten -as posted above).

The Scandinavians used their amusetter primarily as a horse-drawn piece drawn by a team of two harnessed in tandem. There is evidence of 3-pdr versions as well.

It appears, however, that Hessians and Hanoverian light troops, at least on the battlefield, used the amusette 1-pdr as a battalion gun drawn by soldiers on foot. That is the conventional wisdom, at any rate. You will see modern illustrations and models depicting this. I have yet to look into the subject except to say that Colonel von Scharnhorst stated that the Hanoverians had experimented with the shaft trail gun for field artillery but abandoned ithe experiment in spring 1794.

The term 'amusette' seems to have been coined by the Marechal de Saxe in the 1740s, at least as a military term, and it would seem what he had in mind was the large musket (on wheels) rather than the small field piece, although I haven't looked into that, either. It does look however as if it was, effectively, his witty name for what had been called a falconette.

In the early 1800s Scharnhorst, described a carriage designed in 1777 by Lieutenant General von Schaumberg for use with a light piece (1-1/2 -pdr) by Portuguese troops under his command, "a kind of Amusette, which he calls Falconet."

Confused? You should be.

I am afraid I did not understand your final question
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 28, 2016 11:28 pm    Post subject:

Ah fuck, I just hit some random refresh key combination and by that deleted my whole long-ass response. -.-

So I'll make it much shorter: I've done my research about Amusettes and completely agree with your observations. I'd say falconets are per definitionem not amusettes, because falconets are crafted as guns (a cannon so to say) while amusettes are heavy, long muskets in combination with a mantlet or (even though I'm not entirely sure on that) tripods. I do agree that the ambiguous, questionable use of the term through Hessians and Scandinavians leads to unnecessary confusion.

If the conventional wisdom (very nice) is right with all of its quotations, interpretations and illustrations I would conclude from your and my own research that actual Amusettes were predominantly used in British service such as the Queens Rangers as well as hired light Hessian and Hanoverian regiments. I also read about Croatian Grenzers in Austrian service using them, but not too sure on that. Considering that the Maréchal de Saxe was a German in French service it seems plausible Amusettes were also used by French troops to some degree.

I got the impression they were seldomly used and eventually fell out of use, which would explain why so little is known about them. That made me consider them either as a technology (more armor in exchange for less speed) or as a shared or unique sniper-style unit. I can also imagine a visual representation of this, even though I'd want this to be a single unit then.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2016 8:47 pm    Post subject:

re the lost 'long-ass' response, I feel your pain.

Roger the difference between a 'falconet' and an amusette. I was thinking more of the use of guns in the former class as a long range sniping weapon (as described by the Royal Artillery mueum at Wooolwich). The situation clearly became more muddy later in the C18th as we find Scharnhorst. referring to a falconet on an amusette carriage. It's not clear whether the weapon, attached to light infantry, is a musket or a cannon. Drawings of the carriage don't help.

While the term amusette was coined by De Saxe for his large bore breechloading musket, it was of course part of his Reveries and never saw the light of day (That is assuming that de Saxe was indeed the original inventor of the term in the first place). So, once his book was published posthumously, the field was open for adopting the term and using it, Humpty Dumpty-like, to mean exactly what you wanted it to mean. Hence the promiscuous use of the word for the next fifty years or so; one minute a light 1-pdr field piece, next a 5cm heavy musket. French being the lingua-franca of the professional soldier, notably amongst Germans, it is hardly surprising we find it in use by Hessians and Hanoverians ias early as 1762.

It seems that amusette most often meant a light, manoeuverable infantry support weapon, not expected to win battles but of use until real guns could be brought up

My guess (i'm behind with my reading), is that the German contract troops sent to America brought the muske t amusette with them and one was subsequently adopted by the Queen's Rangers circa 1778. A 'wall-gun' type weapon doesn't seem a likely weapon for American ranging companies to have in their arsenal as a matter of course. To complicate matters, the Rangers' 'amuzette' may in fact have been a field piece. In 1780 the rangers deposited theirs with the artillery park in New York and in 1781 the carriage of the ranger's '[amuzette' [/i]was reported as breaking down in action at Williamsburg. Ambiguous but intriguing. More research required.

The drawings of heavy muskets attached to Royal Artillery light gun detachments that Congreve lodged in the Woowich archives in 1783 are interesting. Do we have iny evidence that this snazzy set-up with mantlets on limbers actually saw service in the field?

We do however have mention of amusettes being attached to the British light infantry battalions besieging Charleson in 1780 and these seem to have been of the heavy musket variety. It seems that Ewald and Charles Lee both mention them ( I am quoting from the RevList forum)

The term amusette was indeed used by the French as well, bien sur, but used applied to a light field piece- the Rostaing gun. Although this was on a conventional gun carriage, indeed a very early block trail design, the affut monté had detachable shafts to which a horse could be harnessed without a limber. Mostly of 1 to 2 pdr size , the Rostaing gun was designed primarily for Colonial campaigns and, for example, was in service on the island of St Lucia in 1778 when the French unsuccessfully attempted to retake it from the British, who described three 1-pdr amusettes firing "grape and leaden balls of one pound weight with great effect upon our line" until silenced by four British 3-pdrs.

The Grenzer reference rings a bell.

Cool
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