A Few Suggestions - Civs, Features, etc.

 
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theyseemeroland
Prussian Landwehr
Prussian Landwehr


Joined: 27 May 2016
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 4:35 am    Post subject: A Few Suggestions - Civs, Features, etc.

*I've edited this post heavily to organize the content*

New Features
Spoiler:


Slaves – Slaves are a secondary villager unit which can be trained in batches at the Market or Dock for Coin, or accrued at Trade Posts. Slaves take up their own special train limit; they are very weak, they cannot hunt, and they are like Livestock in that if isolated from any other friendly buildings or units, they can be captured by enemy players. Slaves are meant to be the single greatest alteration to original gameplay, introducing a new labor resource of sorts.

Mines – In the Imperial Age, Sappers and other military units can construct Land Mines, hidden structures which self-destruct when passed over by any unit, dealing large amounts of damage. They are expensive and dangerous, as they destroy friendly and hostile units. Certain Naval units can construct Naval Mines, of a similar character but hidden underwater. Some units can reveal the location of Land Mines and Naval Mines.

Orders –
Spoiler:

Catholic European Civilizations (Spanish, French until Imperial, Portuguese, Italian, Austrian, and German until Reformation) and the Russians can host a religious Order beginning in the Colonial Age. The Russians have their own unique Orders. At the Church, much like at an Asian Consulate, players can choose from among different Orders, each with special benefits like units, buildings, and technologies:
Dominicans
Spoiler:

Specialize in education. Choosing the Dominicans delivers a Monastery Wagon and three Dominican Priests, who can be tasked at any building to increase research and training speed. A limit of 6 Dominican Priests is imposed. “Scholasticism” greatly increases the research speed of Universities, and allows Dominican Priests to research various University and Church upgrades on their person. The Dominican Monastery doubles as a University.


Franciscans
Spoiler:

Specialize in charity and mission work, granting unique economic and Native upgrades. Choosing the Franciscans delivers a Monastery Wagon and three Franciscan Friars, who build Shelters (free temporary Houses) and Trade Posts and can convert enemy Native warriors. Franciscan Friars also have a Ceasefire ability, which temporarily halts all military action in their vicinity, but renders them motionless. A limit of 6 Franciscan Friars is imposed. “Charity” allows Franciscan Friars to gather resources like Villager units.


Benedictines
Spoiler:

Specialize in manual labor and prayer, granting bonuses to all economic and military performance so long as the Monks are perpetually tasked on their Monastery, without interruption. Choosing the Benedictines delivers a Monastery wagon and three Benedictine Monks, who can be tasked on the Monastery to grant performance bonuses to all units and buildings. A limit of 12 Benedictine Monks is imposed. “Divine Office” gives the Benedictine Monastery a gather rate increase aura.


Teutons
Spoiler:

Specialize in offensive warfare, granting unique military upgrades. Choosing the Teutons delivers a Monastery Wagon and three Teutonic Knights, very powerful archaic hand Infantry with attack bonuses versus Cavalry and Native units. The Teutonic Monastery can be upgraded to double as a powerful Castle. Later in the game, the Teutons can deliver the Teutonic Grandmaster, a hero unit similar to Asian Monks or Native American Warchiefs and a powerful hand infantry unit; the Teutonic Grandmaster can be revived if he falls in battle, and can train Teutonic Knights. A limit of 5 Teutonic Knights is imposed.


Hospitallers
Spoiler:

Specialize in defensive warfare, granting unique military and Settler upgrades. Choosing the Hospitallers delivers a Monastery Wagon and three Knights Hospitaller, heavily armored hand cavalry whose presence greatly increases the attack and hitpoints of nearby villager units and defensive buildings and who possess anti-artillery and anti-cavalry bonuses. Knights Hospitaller can also build Hostels, emergency garrison buildings for Settlers from which they may fire. Hostels generate a trickle of coin by being garrisoned in, and heal any units garrisoned in them. The Hospitaller Monastery can be upgraded to double as a powerful Castle. Later in the game, the Hospitallers can deliver the Grandmaster Hospitaller, similar to the Teutonic Grandmaster; the Grandmaster Hospitaller can be revived if he falls in battle, and can train Knights Hospitaller. A limit of 5 Knights Hospitaller is imposed.


Orthodox
Spoiler:

Unique to the Russians, granting powerful unique upgrades to all areas. Choosing the Orthodox delivers a Monastery Wagon and three Orthodox Monks, who can be tasked on their Monastery to provide a resource trickle. A limit of 12 Orthodox Monks is imposed.


Erimitics
Spoiler:

Unique to the Russians, granting powerful bonuses to economic and military performance so long as the Erimitic Monks remain undisturbed. Choosing the Erimitics delivers two Erimitic Monks, who can build Hermitages (huts) and be tasked on them to provide performance enhancement in all areas of gameplay. Hermitages must be built far away from any friendly or enemy units and buildings in order to operate; disturbing the solitude of an Erimitic Monk renders his abilities null. A limit of 3 Erimitic Monks is imposed.



Missions -
Spoiler:

similar to Orders, but are available to Asian and Native American Civilizations. Perhaps these could replace Consulate alliances:
Jesuits –
Spoiler:

Specialize in education, granting powerful unique economic and military upgrades. Choosing the Jesuits delivers a Mission Wagon and three Jesuit Missionaries, who can heal units, and provide a proximity gathering bonus. The Jesuits can later ship a University Wagon. A limit of 3 Jesuit Missionaries is imposed.


Franciscans –
Spoiler:

Specialize in charity, granting economic bonuses. Choosing the Franciscans delivers a Mission Wagon and three Franciscan Missionaries, who can heal units, gather resources (Missionaries cannot be tasked on a Fire Pit), build Shelters, invoke the Ceasefire ability, and convert enemy Native warriors. A limit of 5 Franciscan Missionaries is imposed. The Franciscans can later ship a Hospital Wagon.


Augustinians –
Spoiler:

Specialize in education, granting technology bonuses. Choosing the Augustinians delivers a Mission Wagon and three Augustinian Missionaries, who can be tasked on any building to increase research and training speed. A limit of 5 Augustinian Missionaries is imposed. The Augustinians can later ship a Factory Wagon.



Capture – Some buildings left unattended can be captured for use by another player. This excludes Forts, Castles, Strongholds, Outposts, Blockhouses, Town Centers, Trade Posts, and Docks. Some ships have the Board ability, allowing them to capture ships below a certain amount of health.

Proficiency and Veterancy – Villager units become more effective at a task the longer they have been continually assigned to it, and military units become stronger the more combat they’ve seen.

Herbs – Wild plants that can be gathered by any unit to replenish its health. Important in the early game, less so as healer units become available. Herbs are sparse, and serve mostly to rejuvenate Explorers and Villagers harmed by wild predators and treasure guardians in the early game.

New standard European techs –
Spoiler:

Town Center (“Citizens” [III] upgrades all Villager units except for Slaves, Serfs, and Coureur de Bois to Citizens, with increased hitpoints, attack, resistance, and gather rates, and which can be taxed; all Age up costs increased), Market (“Prospecting” [III] allows Explorers to uncover a few additional Gold Mines; “Hereditary Slavery” reduces Slave Coin cost Arrow “Columbian Exchange” [II] allows resources other than Coin to be exchanged for Slaves; “Reforestation” [I] allows Villager units to plant trees, which fatten with wood over a long period of time Arrow “Botany” [II] allows trees, Berry Bushes, and herbs to yield XP by being gathered; “Apprenticeship” [I] allows Villager units with high proficiency to increase the proficiency acquisition speed of nearby Villager units performing the same task-> “Journeymen” [II] extends the benefits of the “Apprenticeship” tech to allied Villager units Arrow“Masterpiece” [III] allows Villager units with high proficiency in constructing buildings to construct buildings with extra hitpoints and resistance; “Mercantilists” [II] greatly improves Market exchange rates Arrow “Capitalists” [III] allows Citizens to increase in proficiency more quickly and allows them to acquire a higher level of proficiency Arrow “Industrial Capitalists” [IV] allows Factories to increase in proficiency; “”Investment” [I] allows Banks to Invest in a certain resource, the collection of which by all players will accrue very small amounts of Coin through the course of the whole game), Livestock Pen (“Husbandry” [I] allows Livestock to train additional Livestock Arrow “Selective Breeding” [II] causes Livestock to fatten more quickly and to be able to fatten more Arrow “Professional Breeders” [III] allows Livestock to slowly but automatically produce more Livestock for free; “Introduction” [I] allows Livestock Pens to train any kind of Livestock that fattens at a friendly Livestock Pen), Church (“Herbology” [II] allows Healers to simultaneously heal all friendly units by gathering Herbs Arrow “Pharmacology” [IV] allows Factories to produce Medicine, slowly but constantly healing all friendly units; “Relics” [II] allows Clergy units to gather treasures), Dock (“Merchant Marines” [III] gives Fishing Boats a weak attack; “Cargo Quays” [I] allows Docks to serve as Home City Shipment Points and to exchange resources, like a Market; “Combing Nets” [I] increasing Villager units’ Shore Fish gather rate), Capitol (“Berlin Conference” [V] allows Explorers to use the Claim ability again, with a larger area and a permanent effect, and allows Explorers to train all available native warriors, while increasing the train limit of all native warriors; “Total War” [V] causes all military structures to quickly and automatically produce batches of military units for a reduced cost, and allows Factories to produce heavy Artillery significantly faster and Naval Shipyards to produce warships significantly faster, while greatly reducing the population of heavy Artillery and increasing the train limit of warships – however, the value of all of these units will suffer slightly), University (“Vocational Training” [III] allows Villager units to spawn with some amount of proficiency in all tasks already acquired; “Corvée” [V] causes resource gathering to amplify all friendly construction speed, and Citizens can be taxed for Wood, Food, or XP in addition to Coin; “War Academy” [IV] allows soldiers to spawn already possessing some amount of veterancy; “Scientific Revolution” [III] causes all Techs to garner extra XP when researched, and decreases all research time).



Naval Shipyard – A Factory attached to water which slowly but automatically produces free warships.

Shore Fishing – Fish near to the shore that can be gathered by Villager units.

Conquest –
Spoiler:

A new game mode in which the known world, consisting of random map scripts or set custom maps based on those locations, serves as the arena. A player begins, based on his chosen Civilization, with a certain portion of the world already under his control. He can conquer surrounding territory by beating enemy Civilizations within their own territories. A persistent Home City is created anew for each Conquest game, with each match serving to provide XP to advance it. Additionally, each territory owned offers special bonuses for the player controlling it. Other Civilizations present in the world may either be distinct players in the game, building a Home City and conquering territory (including yours), resulting in a turn-based game, or normal computer players which only defend their own land. Features include: World Routes, connecting different parts of the world and control of which offers bonuses to the Home City and in-game factors such as Market rates, Home City shipment delivery speed, and reinforcements; Diplomacy, allowing alliances between different players (resulting in multi-player matches); and Siege, a special game type in which one player defends a heavily fortified area of the map while the other player assaults it in hopes of capturing or destroying it (with great bonuses for capturing rather destroying). Minimum and Maximum Age settings can also be altered.



Claim – All European Explorers have the Claim ability, which allows them to claim a spot of land in their vicinity, preventing any other player from being able to construct buildings on the land for a long but limited time. The ability can normally only be used once.

Unique names – Like ships, all Town Centers, Churches, and Cathedrals are randomly assigned unique names.

Assassination – Spies, Ninja, Assassins and other similar units can disguise themselves as enemy villagers, and possess a one-shot kill Assassination ability which does not alert the enemy of the attack. They also have the ability to climb over structures and natural barriers, and can cross water.

Libertador – A hero unit, similar to an Explorer, delivered to a colony upon revolting from its mother country; he can be revived if he falls in battle.

Privateers – Privateers can be hired in fleets at the Dock, and gather Coin by sinking enemy ships.

Sakers – A Colonial Age European artillery unit; relatively weak and cheap, but formidable in large groups.

Flagships – Flagships are very large, very powerful, and very expensive ships available once a player’s fleet reaches a certain size. A player can only have one Flagship at a time, unless he captures an enemy Flagship.

Beavers – Wild animals hunted for Coin.

Rubber Trees – Trees tapped rather than chopped for Coin. Infinite source of Coin, but can be destroyed like other trees by cannon fire and explosions.

Salt Mines – Mineral deposits mined for Food amplification.

Ruins – Remnants of decrepit structures, which still act as natural barriers. Explorers, Warchiefs, Asian Monks and Sappers can Fortify Ruins, similarly to constructing Trading Posts in Sockets, converting them into usable defensive buildings which can be garrisoned in and fired from. When Fortified Ruins are destroyed, they revert back to their original state, like a Trade Post socket, and can be fortified again by other players.

Shipwrecks – Shipwrecks can be found in water and harvested by Fishing Boats for Wood.

Natives – Trade posts built at a Zen Monastery can now train a Monk unit – the Roshi, a melee martial arts master, similar to the Chinese Shaolin Master. The Maya allow for the training of Holcan Spearmen and Plumed Archers, long-ranged foot archers similar to Arrow Knights with an attack bonus versus buildings and ships.

Citizens – Standard European civilians can be upgraded to Citizens, who produce a trickle of Coin proportionate to the gathering rate of whatever they are tasked on. This taxation can be configured at the Town Center as it negatively impacts the actual gather rate of the Citizens. Citizens retain their former special Civilization attributes. Coureur de Bois and Serfs cannot be upgraded to Citizens. French civilians can be upgraded to Sansculottes instead of Citizens.

Naval Shipyard – A Factory attached to water which slowly but automatically produces free warships.

Shore Fishing – Fish near to the shore that can be gathered by Villager units.


[i]Current Civilizations


Spanish
Spoiler:

The Spanish Explorer can train an Expedition – a Banner Army, with better units available as the game goes on. The Explorer can also be upgraded to a mounted unit. The Aventuros is a unique Spanish unit: a mounted Crossbowman . The large Tercio Banner Army includes all of the archaic Spanish Infantry: Crossbowmen, Pikemen, Rodelero. Lancers and Aventuros are available together in another Banner Army. If a water Home City shipment point is available, the Spanish can send Treasure Ships, boats from which a large but finite amount of Coin can be gathered if they are close enough to shore, with a relatively weak attack but high hitpoints – the “Treasure Ship” card ships one, while the “Treasure Ship Fleet” ships three. However, if a Treasure Ship is destroyed, it will become a water Treasure, whose yield is equal to the Coin left onboard when it was destroyed. The Spanish also receive a large shipment of Coin each time they advance to the Colonial Age. The Spanish receive free Jesuits in the Fortress Age. The “Reconquista” card ships a large contingent of archaic Infantry and Cavalry, and increases archaic Infantry and Cavalry and Explorer attack against other archaic Infantry and Cavalry. The “Black Legend” card decreases the cost of Slaves and increases their gathering rates, at the cost of greatly decreasing their hitpoints and allowing them to be captured from a greater distance; additionally, each Trade Post at a Native Village will muster two Slaves. The Spanish can build a Naval Shipyard in the Industrial Age – a Dock which slowly produces warships for free, like a Factory. The “Privateer Warfare” card gives Spanish ships increased resistance to Privateers. “Escape Ship” provides a chance of garrisoned ships rescuing their units when the ship is destroyed by deploying a garrisoned Dinghy. The powerful “Spanish Armada” card, available in the Fortress Age, delivers a large number of Galleons. “Salvage Crews” allows some of the resources put into training a ship to return to the player when that ship is destroyed. The Spanish begin games with a few Pigs, and their Pigs fatten and breed faster than those of other Civilizations. The Spanish also begin games with an Explorer. “El Camino” increases the movement speed of all civilian units. The “Treaty of Tordesillas” card prevents enemies from building in the vicinity of any Spanish Town Center, and preserves the effect in the area of the original Town Center even after it has been destroyed; however, all Spanish Town Centers built after this must be in the vicinity of another Spanish Town Center. “Reconquista Veterans” allows all archaic military units to be trained with a degree a veterancy already attained. The Spanish Explorer has a very large Claim area, and can use the Claim ability twice. In the Imperial Age, the “Line of Torres Vedras” card ships two Fort Wagons and four Outpost Wagons, and allows all Spanish Wagons to use Stealth (including when they are deploying). Instead of Minutemen, Spanish Town Centers can call on Miquelets.



British
Spoiler:

Yeoman is a Settler specializing in building and gathering from Farms, with a long-ranged anti-melee-infantry longbow attack. Yeomen replace Longbowmen. Yeomen cost Food and Wood to train. The “Yeomanry” card increases the attack and range of Yeomen. “Parish Administration” allows Churches to support 10 population and gives Ministers a slight gather rate increase aura. Upon advancing to the Imperial Age, all Slaves become Yeomen and no more Slaves can be acquired. The British can reach a higher maximum population than other Civilizations. In the Imperial Age, the British can train the Maxim Gun, a powerful, more efficient Gatling Gun which takes less population, reloads faster, and has a greater range. Upon advancing to each successive Age, a shipment of units from different subjected Civilizations will be delivered to the Home City shipment point. The “Oxford-Cambridge” card allows the construction of a second University. The “Charter Colony” card ships a Charter Covered Wagon, which deploys to construct a Charter Town Center – a Town Center which is not controlled by the player but defends itself and generates a trickle of Coin for the player. At any point, for a large amount of Coin a player can “Nationalize” a Charter Town Center and use it as a normal Town Center. In the Industrial Age the British can build a Naval Shipyard. The “Battle of the English Channel” card ships a number of Galleys garrisoned with a large number of Yeomen, and allows Galleys to benefit from an attack increase by being garrisoned with archer units. “Lodging” causes Houses to support extra population and to slowly heal military units in their vicinity. “Cottage Gardens” allows Houses to produce a small trickle of Food. “Unsanctioned Contracts” allows the British Flagship to recruit Privateers. British Factories are more efficient, and the British can construct more Factories and do so more quickly. The British can advance to the Industrial Age for less resources and more quickly than other Civilizations. The “Wool Export” card allows Sheep to generate a trickle of Coin by being tasked on Livestock Pens.



American
Spoiler:

The basic American Infantry is the Militiaman, a weak musketeer whose stats increase when in greater numbers. Rather than Mills, the American construct Homesteads, Houses surrounded by farmland which can be garrisoned and fired from. The Americans begin the game with a Libertador. Each Age, each House and Homestead can muster one free Militiaman. The railroad and steamboat upgrades for Trade Routes are provided to the Americans for free. The “Lewis and Clark Expedition” card ships two Explorers and one Native Scout. The powerful “Manifest Destiny” card ships three Covered Wagons and six Frontiersmen. “Pioneers” increases the movement speed, build speed, and resistance of Frontiersmen. “Trail of Tears” eliminates the possibility of forming alliances with Native tribes, but greatly increases military unit attack versus Native units. The “Gold Rush” card ships a number of Miners and increases Miner gather rate. “Cotton Gin” greatly increases the efficiency of American Slaves when tasked on Plantations, but decreases Plantation gather limit. The “First Great Awakening” card ships three Ministers and a Church Wagon, and increases the speed and hitpoints of Ministers. The “Homestead Act” card ships three Pioneer Wagons, which can transform into Homesteads, can garrison civilian units, and have a ranged attack. “Bear Arms” increases the attack of Settlers and Frontiersmen, and gives all Houses a ranged attack. The “Pluralism” policy allows all Clergy units to be able to construct Churches. The “Second Great Awakening” card ships one Bishop, two Ministers, and a Church Wagon, and gives all Ministers, Priests, and Bishops the ability to convert Native units. The American can build multiple Saloons and Dance Halls and have access to cheaper Outlaws. “Poor Richard’s Almanac” increases Homestead gather rates. “Frontier Justice” gives American Explorers and Frontiersmen an attack bonus versus Outlaws, Mercenaries, treasure guardians, and native warriors, allows the Explorer to see stealth units, and allows the Explorer to see the recent paths of enemy units. “Pony Express” increases Cavalry speed. “Gunslinger” greatly increases Explorer Rate of Fire and gives him the chance to perform a free Crackshot attack. American Frontiersmen can use the Claim ability, though their area is much smaller than an Explorer’s. “Conservationism” causes natural resources nearby American units to generate XP so long as they remain untapped, and causes Settlers to increase resource regeneration speed. “Valley Forge” toughens Infantry, increasing their hitpoints, resistance, and speed. The Americans can build special Mills, early Factories which must be built adjacent to water.



Portuguese
Spoiler:

Portuguese Caravels can train Settlers slowly and build Docks and Lighthouses. Lighthouses must be build adjacent to water, like Docks, and provide an enormous Line of Sight, but no defense. The Portuguese can build Caravels in the Discovery Age, but Portuguese Caravels have low attack and defense until upgraded. Upon Revolution, the Brazilians can train Bandeirantes, Frontiersmen who have a chance of turning defeated enemy units into Slaves. Portuguese Explorers have a chance of turning defeated Treasure Guardians and Native warriors into Slaves. Slaves are cheap in the early game, and become more expensive as time goes on. Portuguese Covered Wagons have a ranged attack. The Portuguese begin games with an Explorer and a Caravel, if playing on a water map. The Portuguese Explorer, like the Spanish, has a large Claim area. Instead of Trading Posts, the Portuguese construct Feitoria, which allow for extra native warriors, can ransom Explorers and receive Home City shipments, have slightly decreased costs and research and train speed, and can train Portuguese Expeditions. Feitoria can be upgraded to provide a resource trickle.



French
Spoiler:

Upon Revolution, the Haitians will liberate their Slaves, turning all Slaves into Citizens, and removing all previous Coureur de Bois, Citizens, and Sansculottes from the game. The French can train Balloons from their Factories. In the Imperial Age all Imperial artillery upgrades are very cheap. In the Industrial Age, the French can build a Naval Shipyard. “Hunting Lodge” allows Coureur de Bois to be trained from Cabins. Coureur de Bois are fast Frontiersmen armed with rifles who excel at gathering natural resources; however, they can only build Trading Posts, Palisades – very cheap walls which are quick to construct – and Cabins – Houses which lend a gathering bonus aura as well as a resource regeneration bonus aura and can be garrisoned in and fired from. Cabins replace Homesteads. French civilian units (except Coureur de Bois) can be upgraded to become either Citizens or Sansculottes, who do not contribute Coin but have decent attack and resistance. The French begin games with an Explorer and a Native Scout. The “Polish Legion” card delivers a number of Polish Winged Hussars, which crush infantry. The powerful “Off the Land” card allows Conscripts to gather resources and to gather from rather than destroy enemy Farms and Plantations. French Sappers are especially efficient. “Bombardier School” gives French Artillery increased resistance versus other Artillery, and decreases their population. “Sanctuary” allows some Outlaws to be trained at Cathedrals. The “Salons” card allows unique Enlightenment technologies to be researched at Houses.



Dutch
Spoiler:

New advanced Settler is the Boer. Destroyed defensive buildings spawn a small number of Militia. The Dutch can build Banks in the Colonial Age, and their Banks generate more Coin the more Banks their allies have. Fluyts can act as Merchant Ships, generating coin by traveling between Docks. The “Townhouses” card [II] increases the population supported by Houses, decreases their cost, and allows them to increase each other’s hitpoints and resistance by proximity to one another. The “Voortrekker” card increases the attack and resistance of Boers versus Native Units, Treasure Guardians, and wild predators. “Informers” allows the Dutch to access the Line of Sight of any Town Center which an Envoy gets close enough to. The Dutch train Envoys at the Capitol, and can upgrade Envoys to use the Ceasefire ability. The Dutch have access to a cheap Mercenary known as a Zwarte Hoop, a weak Pikeman-type footsoldier.



German
Spoiler:

The Germans can choose at any point to undergo Reformation, by doing which they lose access to the Orders available to Catholic European Civilizations, but gain access to unique German technologies.



Russian
Spoiler:

Unlike other Civilizations, the Russians do not have Settlers and Slaves; their only villager unit is the Serf. Serfs cannot hunt; they take up ½ of a population slot, and are very weak. Serfs have a limited lifespan. Food is gathered from Estates, which can also train Boyars – special military units who can hunt. Population is supported by Blockhouses and Villages. Cossack Villages, like Blockhouses, provide frontier defense, can only be built by Cossacks, and very slowly produce free Cossacks, which occupy no population and can hunt. The Russian begin games with an Explorer and a Cossack. The Russian Explorer can hunt. The Russian can reach a higher maximum population than other Civilizations. The Russian do not have a Revolution option. Russian units are not slowed down by snow. The “Scorched Earth” card causes all Serfs to move much faster, but also causes any buildings, Slaves, or Livestock which would be captured by the enemy to instead be destroyed. “Hereditary Fiefs” allows Serfs to spawn with a high degree of proficiency in farming already acquired.



Ottoman
Spoiler:

The Ottomans cannot build Saloons; instead, they recruit Mamelukes from their Markets and Outlaws at their Strongholds. Ottoman Explorers can turn enemy civilian units into Slaves. Strongholds take the place of Forts, with much less attack but far more hitpoints and siege resistance, and can be upgraded. The Ottomans do not have a Revolution option. The Ottomans train Subjects (Villagers) as every other Civilization; they are not automatically produced. Ottoman infantry are divided into Bazouks, Azaps, and Janissaries – Bazouks are weak melee infantry trained in small batches, while Azaps are light archer units and Janissaries are elite Musketeers trained individually. The Ottoman Civilization possesses a mix of European and Asian civilization traits: its Imams are closer to European Priests and Ministers than to Asian Monks; it can build Wonders to advance in Age (though it needn’t always); like Asian Civilizations in general, it relies on numbers rather than technology; it can forge alliances with Asian and European Civilizations at its Consulate. The “Clericalism” card greatly increases the efficiency and hitpoints of Imams, but causes them to take up 5 population each. The “Gunpowder Empire” card ships a contingent of anti-infantry Sakers and Hand Cannoneers in the Discovery Age, allows the construction of some Artillery an Age early, and slightly decreases the cost of Artillery later in the game. The “Siege of Constantinople” card ships 2 Great Bombards and increases Great Bombard range. The “Siege of Malta” card increases Janissary, Azap, and Bazouk damage against Knights Hospitaller, Teutonic Knights, Teutonic Grandmasters, and Grandmaster Hospitallers. The powerful “Slave Uprising” card transforms all Slaves into Mamelukes. “Merchants” allows Trading Posts to provide population space. “Pilgrimage Site” allows your Mosques to generate a trickle of Coin. “Pilgrim Shelter” allows Trading Posts to garrison civilian units and provide a healing aura. Ottoman Markets generate a trickle of Coin, which decreases with each successive Age. The “Mediterranean Slave Trade” card exchanges all of a player’s Coin for a greater amount of Slaves. The “Indoctrination” card allows Ottoman Explorers to turn enemy civilian units into Janissaries instead of Slaves, and enemy Slaves captured by Ottoman Explorers turn into Janissaries. At the Consulate, the Ottoman can choose to ally themselves with the Venetians, gaining access to Merchants, Condotierri, and Xebecs.



Italians
Spoiler:

Begin games with an Explorer and a Bishop. Bishops can bless buildings and units, increasing their productivity; they can also heal nearby units. When a Bishop dies, his successor will spawn soon after from the Home City Shipment Point. Condottieri are powerful Mercenary warlords available from the early game, which continually draw Coin from the player’s resource deposits. If the player controls Condottieri and is unable to supply Coin, then the Condottieri will go rogue and become hostile to all players. Condottieri can train Mercenary units, like a Japanese Daimyo. Italians recruit Mercenaries from Town Centers, and get Mercenaries cheaper and earlier than other Civilizations. Mercenaries are trained in Banner Armies. Italian buildings increase in siege resistance the closer they are to a Town Center. “Commune Incorporation” greatly extends the range of this effect. Special villager unit is the Merchant; Merchants gather slowly and move quickly, and produce Coin by traveling between Markets – the longer the distance between the two Markets, the more Coin is produced. Instead of Forts, the Italians construct Citadels – powerful Town Centers. Italian Civilizations differ depending on which City-State (hybrid Home City and Council feature) sponsors the colony. The Italians can construct Banks, like the Dutch, and beginning in the Discovery Age; however, each subsequent Bank is more expensive than the last. The Italians do not train Fishing Boats, but their Merchant Vessels (Xebecs) fill this role while also acting as naval Merchants, producing Coin by travelling between Docks; the Italians can train Galleys at their Docks. Italian Galleys are generally weaker than other European Galleons, but are cheaper and available earlier. “Galleas” upgrades Galleys to Galleases, which have increased stats. Instead of Revolution, the Italians have the choice of advancing to the Imperial Age with the City-State they began the game with, or choosing Risorgimento, by which they gain some of the benefits of all of the different Italian City-States, while gaining access to entirely new units; upon choosing Risorgimento, a contingent of Redshirts is delivered to the Home City Shipment Point. The Italian leader under Risorgimento is Giuseppe Garibaldi. The “Expedition of the Thousand” card delivers several Smuggler Vessels garrisoned with Redshirts. The Italians can recruit Craftsmen from a Guildhall. The Italian also begin games with an Architect. “Inventor” allows Architects to construct one unique unit per Age. Instead of Homesteads, the Italians can build Villas. “Arabic Numerals” increases the efficiency of Merchants and of trade at the Market. The “Lepanto” card greatly bolsters the Italian navy by increasing the build limit, attack, and hitpoints of Galleys, and delivers a large shipment of Galleys; the “Humanism” card unlocks many unique upgrades at the University – “Oratory” gives all Clergy units and hero units a morale boost aura, increasing gather rates and attack and resistance; “Classical Architecture” increases the hitpoints and resistance of all Italian buildings… The “Angelus” card gives Churches the Angelus ability, which when activated causes an increase in build speed and gather rate in their vicinity (after a short prayer). “Nepotism” allows Universities to research technologies and produce Specialists more cheaply, but corruption bogs down the system and greatly decreases research speed and Specialist efficiency. “Embargo” prevents other players from exchanging resources at their Markets. “Sextant” increases Xebec and Galley movement speed and Line of Sight. The “Maritime Merchants” card allows Xebecs to produce an XP trickle and to exchange resources like Markets. “Tariffs” robs all resource crates shipped for the rest of the game of a percentage of their yield, to be delivered directly into the coffers of the Italians. “Caravan” allows Merchants to increase each other’s movement speed, attack, and resistance. “Florins” allows the Italian to receive a trickle of Coin based on the Coin gathering of their allies. “Citizens” upgrades Merchants to Citizen Merchants, increasing their gather rates and movement speed when trading; however, Citizen Merchants are not taxed like other European Citizens. “Economic Pressure” causes Italian resource exchange to negatively impact enemy exchange rates. “Bergs” allows Markets to support some population, gives Markets a ranged attack, and greatly increases their siege resistance. “Warehouse Crews” allows resource crates to be slowly but automatically gathered. “Mama’s Boy” causes your Italian women’s cooking to be so dear to their boys’ hearts that they never leave home, increasing their gather rate when near Houses but decreasing it when not in the vicinity. The “Spaghetti Western” card delivers a shipment of Renegados, Comancheros, and Pistoleros. “House Blessing” greatly increases the resistance of Houses when garrisoned by Clergy units. Italian infantry include: Pikemen, Hand Cannoneers, Crossbowmen, Musketeers and Greenshirt (Fusiliers with a powerful melee attack; Redshirts under Risorgimento). Italian Cavalry include: Hussars, Utili, and Elmeti. Artillery include: Ribauldequins (with the “Master Inventors” card), Sakers, Culverins, Falconets, Mortars, Petards, Sappers, Mountain Guns (fast-moving anti-infantry and anti-Artillery Artillery) and Grenadiers. Naval units include: Xebecs, Galleys, Corvettes, Frigates, Monitors, and Gondolas (for the Venetians). Mercenaries include: Landsknecht, Swiss Pikemen, Pavise, Highwaymen, Maltese Hoop Throwers, Repentant Corsairs, Repentant Janissaries, Repentant Hashashins, Stradiots, Repentant Mamelukes, and Men-at-Arms. Unique units include: Greenshirts/Redshirts, Elmeti (as a non-Mercenary), Merchants, Bishops (Cardinals), Condotierri, Architects (Inventors), and Merchant Vessels (Xebecs). The different Italian City-States are:
[center][i]Florence (Lorenzo de Medici; Explorer can build Markets and act as a Merchant; “Boar Spear” increases Pikeman attack and melee resistance; “Machiavellian Reforms” gives Citizens arquebuses and an attack bonus versus Infantry; Tailors work much more efficiently and also generate a trickle of Coin; “Linen Monopoly” restricts Workshops to Tailors, but allows multiple Workshops to operate simultaneously; “Linen Production” allows all Merchants to act as Tailors, and decreases the cost of Sheep at the Livestock Pen; the powerful “Cortigiano” card increases the build speed, gather rate, movement speed, hitpoints, attack, and resistance of Architects, allows them to gather any resource, gives them the ability to act as Merchants and any kind of Craftsman or Specialist, allows them to heal other units, and grants them arquebuses and rapiers with excellent marksmanship and swordsmanship skills – these bellissimo sons of mamas can do everything; “Statistics” increases Banks’ Coin trickle; Inventors can construct Automatons, Ornithopters, Scythe Chariots, and Siege Tanks; “Patrons” decreases the cost of Architects, and allows them to take up no population space),
Venice (Sebastiano Veniero; the Venetians can construct more Town Centers than other Civilizations, and can construct multiple Town Centers in the Discovery Age; Venetian Merchants can turn defeated enemy civilian units, treasure guardians, and native warriors into Slaves; allied civilian units experience an increase in gather rate when near Venetian Town Centers; Galleys are cheaper and stronger; Gondolas are cheap, fast naval transports; “Legacy of Marco Polo” drastically increases Explorer Line of Sight and attack versus Treasure Guardians, and reveals the location of all Trade Sites on the map; all buildings have an increased resistance to Ship fire; some buildings may be built over water; Ships can cross very shallow water; marsh does not slow down movement speed; the “Shipwright” card allows Architects to construct Naval units when near water; the “Tourism Economy” card causes Houses to generate a trickle of Coin, but they no longer provide population, and Merchants have reduced movement speed; Xebecs provide population space; the “Commercial Colonies” card allows Xebecs to construct Town Centers near the shore; the “Mediterranean Slave Trade” card exchanges all currently controlled Slaves for a very large amount of Coin; Inventors can construct Automatons, Diving Suits, Mirror Towers, and Fire Ships),
Rome (Paul III; Priests can be upgraded to Bishops, and Bishops can be upgraded to Cardinals, which perform better all-around, but only one Bishop or Cardinal is allowed per Town Center; Romans begin games with extra Architects; Romans can train additional Architects; “Commission” greatly decreases the cost of buildings constructed by Architects; Architects can build many more monuments, each unlocked by building the last; instead of Cathedrals, the Romans build Basilicas, which generate more Food or Gold and offers the Papal Visit power, which increases build speed and Bank productivity for a short time; all religious orders are available, a new one with each Age; “Seminary” allows Churches to automatically produce free Priests over a long period of time; Roman Universities are very expensive, and only operate when tasked on by Priests, Bishops, or Cardinals, but generate a trickle of Coin and XP; “Clericalism” enhances all of the abilities of Priests, Bishops, Nuncios, Inquisitors, and Cardinals, but causes all of them to take up more population space each; “Corporal Works” allows Churches and Basilicas to provide population space; “Simony” greatly decreases the cost of all Clergy units, but also decreases their stats; “Nipoti” gives Explorers the abilities of Cardinals; “Slave Galleys” allows your Galleys to be rowed by Slaves, decreasing their cost and population, but also decreasing their speed; the Romans can train Swiss Guards from their Basilicas; the Order of St. John Banner Army includes Maltese Hoop Throwers and Knights Hospitaller; “Vatican Arsenal” increases Swiss Guard stats; “Papal Property” causes all Monasteries to produce a trickle of Coin; “Bodyguard” allows Cardinals to train Swiss Guards; the powerful “Counter-Reformation” card, available in the Fortress Age, undoes the effects of “Nipoti”, “Nepotism”, “Simony”, “Sell Indulgences”, “Clericalism”, increases the speed and hitpoints of all religious Order units, allows any Citizen, Architect, or Merchant to become a Dominican, Franciscan, or Benedictine Monk, and replaces all Inquisitors with Jesuit Missionaries; the powerful “Military Orders” card turns all existing Clergy units (except for Bishops and Cardinals) into Teutonic Knights and Knights Hospitaller; Inventors can construct Automatons, Sentinels, Ballista, and Saucer Tanks),
Milan (Louis XII; rather than an Explorer, the Milanese begin games with a Condottiere; Milanese Condottieri can construct Outposts and Walls; the “Condottieri Tyrants” card allows Condottieri to construct Town Centers; the “Siege Engineers” card allows Architects to construct artillery on the spot; Condotierri are stronger and train Mercenaries much more quickly, and do not cause a negative Coin trickle; “Cisalpine Republic” greatly increases Capitol research speed),
and Naples (Frederick of Naples; Corsairs and Repentant Janissaries are available at Docks; rather than a normal Town Center, the Neapolitans begin games with a Citadel; the Neapolitans have access to the units and some unique technologies of their conquerors, the French and Spanish).

In general, the Italians rely on a variety of early economic advantages and options, networks of small, strong clusters of buildings, and armies of weak archaic soldiers bolstered by a variety of readily-available Mercenaries and supported by many clerical units. Their early-game economy is very powerful, but if it is not well managed then the Italians will suffer in the later game for want of being able to support a mercenary-led army. Maybe the Italian City-States could replace Politicians, so one must be chosen to age up.



Iroquois
Spoiler:

The Iroquois can choose to become integrated with the United States Revolutionary Civilization instead of advancing to the Imperial Age. In the Colonial Age, the Iroquois can choose to ally themselves either with the British or with the French. Most Iroquois Infantry units possess the Stealth ability. Iroquois ranged Infantry do not suffer from range, Line of Sight, or accuracy loss when surrounded by dense forest. The Iroquois skip the Industrial Age. Instead of a Home City, the Iroquois send shipments from a Confederacy. The Longhouse is a House which also trains Infantry. The Tobacco Farm, available in the Colonial Age, is a faster source of Coin than the Plantation. The Iroquois do not have Villagers; instead, their basic Infantry and civilian unit is the Warrior. Warriors can gather wild natural resources slowly while in Stealth mode. The Iroquois Warchief can train an Ambush. The Iroquois Warchief can transform into a Warchief Canoe to traverse water, which can be upgraded. If the Iroquois advance to the Imperial Age, they may train Banner Armies culled from different nations within the Iroquois Confederacy.



Sioux
Spoiler:

The Sioux can train two types of villager units: the normal Villager, and the Hunter. Hunters act as both mounted Villagers who can hunt wild animals and Travois which can unpack into a Teepee, a weak House. If a Teepee is destroyed while unpacked, it deploys a Warrior. Teepees still provide a hitpoint and resistance bonus to surrounding units. Hunters cost much more Food than normal Villagers, as well as some Wood. Instead of Town Centers, the Sioux build Settlements, which act as hybrid Town Centers/Fire Pits surrounded by farmland; the Sioux cannot build independent Farms. Sioux Settlements can train Villagers, Hunters, Warchiefs, and Shamans. Most buildings can be packed into Wagons and unpacked at other locations. Sioux melee Cavalry have attack bonuses against Civilian units. The Sioux can choose to become integrated with the United States Revolutionary Civilization instead of advancing to the Imperial Age. In general, the Sioux make up for inadequate defenses with fast, high-attack units and a generally mobile Civilization. The Sioux, like the Iroquois and Aztec, skip the Industrial Age. The Watchtower is a cheap and weak Outpost. All Wood costs for the Sioux are diminished. Instead of a Home City, the Sioux send shipments from a Confederacy. If the Sioux advance to the Imperial Age, they may train Banner Armies culled from the various peoples of the Sioux Nation. The Sioux no longer begin with free max pop, but do have some sort of population bonus at the start.



Aztec
Spoiler:

Aztec Villagers are slightly more expensive than other Civilizations’. Any military unit has a chance of turning defeated enemy units into Slaves. “Garland Wars” greatly increases the chances of turning defeated enemy units into Slaves, and gives even Villagers the ability to do so. Instead of a Fire Pit, the Aztecs build High Temples. At certain intervals, the Aztecs must sacrifice a unit in order to maintain economic and military performance; without the regular sacrifice, these areas will suffer from general inefficiency. Additional sacrifices can be made to access certain Fire Pit-like bonuses – the more expensive the unit sacrificed, the better bonus accessed. The Aztecs cannot train Slaves on their own, but must rely on combat and regular tributes from Native tribes and Trade Posts in order to secure them. The Aztecs can build a special floating farm called a Chinampa near shorelines. Like the French, the Aztecs possess many unique cards and technologies which greatly increase the power of their allied Native warriors. The Aztecs can also recruit brigades of certain Native warriors for free at their Town Center. The powerful “Triple Alliance” card ships two Town Center Travois in the Discovery Age. The Aztecs possess a ranged Infantry known as an Atlatl – a spear-thrower. In the Imperial Age, the Aztecs can build a Temple of the Sun – the rough equivalent of a European Cathedral in terms of cost and size, it functions as a superior High Temple, with even more powerful bonuses available, and needing less sacrifices. Similarly to the European Revolution, the Aztecs can choose instead of the Imperial Age to undergo Requerimiento, becoming the Viceroyalty of New Spain, gaining many European technologies and units, but losing many unique Aztec units and features, and remaining in the Fortress Age. Upon choosing to become New Spain, a Conquistador is delivered – a powerful mounted warlord, almost identical to a Spanish Explorer. The Aztec ruler is either Cuauhtemoc or Montezuma II. In general, the Aztec are forced to be an aggressive, expansive Civilization from the beginning of the game. Like all Native American Civilizations, the Aztec skip the Industrial Age.


Japanese
Spoiler:

Rather than Ikko-Ikki, the Japanese begin games with a Yamabushi, which can be upgraded to become a very powerful infantry unit; Ikko-Ikki can be acquired as a shipment later in the game as hybrid Villager/Monks. Japanese Monks can train pet Foxes. Daimyo can be killed, but their successors will spawn at their Town Center after some time. An additional Monk, the Shinobi, acts as a powerful Ninja, with his own unique upgrades; he becomes available in the Colonial Age. Yamabushi and Shinobi are upgraded by acquiring new skills and weapons, or Jutsu; the “TEAM Discipleship” card allows Allies to teach their Explorers some of these Jutsu. Shinobi can use the “Ambush” ability to call out a squad of Ninja from thin air. Shinobi can be upgraded to disguise themselves as enemy Villagers, to traverse water, to scale buildings and cliffs, to possess a massive attack bonus against hero units, to have an alternate ranged attack, to be able to attack while in stealth, to use the Assassinate ability – allowing them to attack units without the player controlling them being notified – to plant and safely cross over Mines, to experience no decrease in movement speed in deep snow or sand, and many other abilities. The Yamabushi can be upgraded to have attack bonuses versus nearly every kind of unit, learning the art of a new weapon for each. Samurai can be upgraded to possess a ranged attack and to gain the ability to mount and dismount a horse, changing from Cavalry to Infantry and back again; however, the cost of Samurai is very high, and Samurai can only be trained at Castles (and Dojos). The Japanese can build many more Castles than the Chinese or the Indian, and their Castles have a great attack and resistance bonus against ships, but are weaker against land units. The Japanese must build Houses to support population; Shrines only produce Coin. In general, the Japanese Monks and Samurai form the backbone of any Japanese army; their Monks have many unique abilities available through upgrades. The Japanese Isolation option at the Consulate provides powerful performance enhancements for Monks and Samurai, but little in the way of new units; Isolation gives all Monks and military units an attack bonus versus enemy Clergy units. In addition to light artillery, Japanese Castles train Ninja and Samurai, and offer special upgrades for each. One Daimyo is available for each Town Center. The “Ikko-Ikki Rebellion” card ships a number of Ikko-Ikki – Villager-Monks who can gather resources but cannot hunt or slaughter livestock, have a powerful attack bonus versus Mercenaries, Clergy, and Hero units, and can be revived if they fall in battle. Samurai have a chance of becoming rogue Ronin, hostile to all, if their home Daimyo or Castle are destroyed. “Bushido” greatly increases the defense and attack of Samurai, but prevents them from being healed and causes them to commit glorious seppuku if their Daimyo (any Daimyo which trained them) falls in battle, or if their Castle (any Castle which trained them) is destroyed. “Holy Site” increases the resistance of Shrines against siege attacks. “Ashigaru Marines” upgrades Ashigaru Musketeers into Ashigaru Marines, which have greater speed, range, and melee attack, and greatly increase the attack of any ship they garrison. “Court Life” refines all the Samurai of the land, making them politely take up less population but also slightly decreasing all of their stats. Atakabune can be upgraded to greatly increase their attack and rate of fire. “Peacekeepers” gives Samurai an attack bonus versus Outlaw and civilian units. Japanese naval units include the Fishing Boat, Fune, Atakabune, and Tekkousen.



Chinese
Spoiler:

The Chinese can reach a higher maximum population than other Civilizations. The Chinese do not train Villagers from Town Centers; rather, Villages produce them automatically. Villages are upgraded individually. Town Centers double as Markets, and can control the rate of automatic Villager production. A free Village Rickshaw is delivered in each Age. In general, the Chinese are an expansive, relatively decentralized Civilization: they have little use for more than one Town Center, but will constantly be in need of more Villages. “Fishing Villages” allows Docks to provide some population. The Chinese can call in a Jesuit Mission for cheaper than normal, but will lose it upon advancing to the Imperial Age. Chinese Town Centers can train Bureaucrats – civilian units which increase the efficiency by a small degree of any building which they are tasked to; only Bureaucrats can build Town Centers. The Shaolin Master cannot construct Town Centers, but can found multiple Temples (Villagers cannot build Temples); Chinese Temples can train Disciples and Repentant Outlaws and research improvements for Shaolin Masters and Disciples. Additionally, each Temple can be set to practice one of several Schools, which will influence the abilities of that Temple’s Disciples. Temples can be upgraded to have defensive fortifications. Chinese Rice Paddies are very cheap. Chinese Villages can call out small forces of Militia. “Deck Gardens” allows Fuchuan to produce a trickle of Food; the “Ming Exploration Fleet” card delivers two Fuchuan and an Envoy ship, increases Fuchuan Line of Sight and speed, and allows them to train Livestock when near the shore. The Envoy Ship is a mobile floating research structure, allowing the Chinese to gain the benefits of some foreign unique technologies; this it does by approaching the Docks of other Civilizations. The “Zheng-he” card delivers a Chinese Explorer, who can increase the stats of any ship he is garrisoned in, build Town Centers, Trade Posts, and Consulates. “Examinations” greatly increases the effectiveness of Bureaucrats but also decreases their train limit and increases their train time. The Hand Rocketeer is a Hand Cannoneer-type unit with a small explosive area of effect. “Gas Bombs” gives Hand Mortars a special attack against units, which lowers its initial attack but decreases the stats of any unit hit by its area of effect. “Abacus” improves exchange rates at the Market. Chinese Imperial Shipyards can train Banner Fleets. A card can be sent to allow Banner Armies to yield one extra unit. Chinese naval units include the Fishing Boat, War Junk, Fire Junk, and Fuchuan. The “Fire Drake Manual” card improves the stats of all Chinese Artillery and enables the construction of Land Mines and Naval Mines. The “Shenji Brigade” card improves the attack of all gunpowder infantry, ships a Banner Army of Fire Lancers and Arquebusiers, and enables the Shenji Brigade Banner Army at the War Academy. Breakers are Chinese Artillery units, consisting of a large mantlet on four wheels giving cover to multiple vertical layers of Arquebusiers. The Fierce Flame Sword Shield Army includes one Breaker and a number of Changdao Swordsmen. Chinese Villagers can worship at Temples to accrue XP, and later some bonuses; this is meant to reflect the importance to the Chinese way of life of Confucian attention to ritual and proper devotion. “The Book of Rites” increases this XP trickle, and allows Bureaucrats and Monks to Worship as well. “Ancestor Worship” rewards the Chinese with a tiny amount of XP upon the death of their units. Along with Rice Paddies, the Chinese can cultivate Tea Gardens, which produce a steady stream of pure Export. “Tea Culture” increases the gather rate of Tea Gardens, and allows them to accrue pure XP rather than Export. “Medicinal Tea” allows Tea Gardens to produce medicinal tea, causing all units to very slowly heal. The Opium Wars should be featured somewhere I think, but I'm not sure how yet.



Indian
Spoiler:

The Indians can gather only Food from their Rice Paddies; they gather Coin from Ivory Sites, which can train Elephants for a great amount of Food, and which gather Coin slowly so long as Elephants are tasked on them. “Saltpeter” greatly increases the amount of Export generated by Ivory Sites. The Indian are limited to one Sacred Field. The Indian can cultivate Tea Gardens, which generate pure Export. The Indian Civilization is only uniquely Indian during the Discovery Age; to advance beyond, the player must choose a European Civilization (British, Portuguese, Dutch, or French), of which the Indians become a modified version; this takes the place of building a Wonder. The only exceptions to this are when the Mughal Empire becomes an option, from the Colonial to the Fortress Age, and when the Maratha Empire becomes an option, from the Fortress Age to the Industrial Age. This system is similar to the Consulate system in that European buildings, units, and technologies are adopted by the Indians, but different in the degree to which the Indian Civilization conforms to its European conqueror’s. Upon choosing a European conqueror, an Explorer from that Civilization will be delivered at the Home City Shipment Point. The Indians begin each game with one Brahman and one Sherpa Guide (Asian Native Scout). Indian units are stratified along the caste system. Brahman are Monks; their population is supported by Monasteries. They are the weakest of the Asian Monks, but constitute a class of units of their own, available in large numbers. Indian military unit population (except for Sepoys) is supported by Palaces. Villager population is supported by Town Centers and Houses. Sepoys (and Sepoy Camelry) become available only after a European conqueror has been chosen (they are not available to Mughal or Maratha Civilizations), and belong to the same population caste as Villagers, supported by Town Centers and Houses. Villagers are created slowly but automatically from Houses; however, Villagers have a limited lifespan. Sepoy and Sepoy Camelry are cheap, but weak compared with Indian military units supported by, and trained from, Palaces. The “Karma” card allows Brahman to spawn sometimes when soldiers die, and soldiers to spawn sometimes when Villagers die. If the Mughal Civilization is chosen, the Indian Civilization becomes Muslim: Mosques replace Temples, Brahman lose much of their abilities, and Imams are available. The “Untouchables” card decreases the effectiveness of Villagers, but causes them to take up ½ of a population slot each.

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theyseemeroland
Prussian Landwehr
Prussian Landwehr


Joined: 27 May 2016
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 3:39 pm    Post subject:

New Civilizations (sort of)

I know there have been a million different versions of this civ idea, but I'm here to throw my two cents in...

Korean
Spoiler:

The Korean can train powerful bowmen known as Gakgung. Like the Chinese, the Korean construct Villages rather than Houses. Rather than Galleons, the Korean train Panokseon at their Docks, which are faster and stronger but have fewer hitpoints, along with Junks, small exploration vessels similar to Caravels, and Turtle Ships – heavily armored warships with decent speed, whose different stances correspond to the use of different Artillery attacks giving them advantages at certain distances or against certain kinds of units (Dragon Head for close-quarters flamethrowers; Grapple for grappling hooks which prevent enemy ships from moving; Chongtong for longer-ranged naval combat; Divine Weapon for offshore bombardment, with less range and damage than a European Monitor or Ironclad, but with an attack bonus against Artillery units), and whose spiked hulls damage enemy ships that get too close and prevent themselves from being boarded. Turtle Ships gain an attack increase when garrisoned with Artillery. “Hyeopseon” increases Junk speed and Line of Sight. The Hwacha is a short-ranged early artillery which fires many flaming arrow rockets at once, capable of devastating light Infantry and archers, and in groups of disabling Artillery. Unlike other Asian Civilizations, the Korean Civilization at its Consulate can choose to ally itself with the Chinese or the Japanese, or to enter into Isolation (much like the Japanese Isolation). The Chinese allow the Korean to reorganize their military into Banner Armies and improves Bureaucrats, while the Japanese allow them to train Samurai, Naginata, and Ashigaru, and improves Cavalry; Isolation allows for shipments of Guerilla Monks, extra Righteous Armies, and extra Town Centers, Castles, and Towers. While in Isolation, the Korean cannot trade at their Market or build Trading Posts; the default selection is Isolation, so a Consulate must be built to allow these features. The Chinese encourage administrative control and growth, taking on part of the cost of Villages, Town Centers, and Trading Posts. The Korean Town Centers can train large Righteous Armies, Irregulars who do not lose health; a new Righteous Army can be called on in each Age. The “Irregular Incorporation” card allows the Korean to train much smaller batches of Righteous Armies, but removes the limit on how many batches may be trained. The “Imperial Aid” card allows Righteous Armies to be delivered with extra resource crates and support units. From their Home City, the Korean can ship Palace Guards, elite anti-Cavalry Infantry armed with a large spear, who also perform well against other Infantry and against Spy-type units. One of the Korean Wonders automatically produces Palace Guards. Korean Castles have a very high attack bonus versus naval units, and Korean Walls are expensive, but have a high resistance to Naval and Artillery units. In addition to Castles, the Korean can build many Towers, cheaper and weaker Outposts. Korean structures repair themselves for free, and increase their overall hitpoints bit by bit each time they self-repair; thus Korean structures are resilient, growing stronger the more attacks they survive. Korean buildings spawn Irregulars when destroyed. “Local Armories” gives Castles the ability to change all Villagers in proximity to them into Irregulars. Korean Rice Paddies are cheap, but are gathered from more slowly than those of other Asian Civilizations. The Korean cannot host any Christian Missionary Orders. Korean buildings and units generate a trickle of XP by sustaining damage. “Pyeonjeon” greatly increases the range of Gakgung. Korean Fishing Boats have a weak attack. The Korean, like the Chinese, have Bureaucrats. Korean Bureaucrats generate XP by being tasked on buildings. “Gwageo Exams” greatly improves all of the stats of Bureaucrats. Korean Artillery includes Cheonja (Heaven Gun – long-ranged, anti-structure), Jija (Earth Gun – long-ranged, anti-Artillery), Hyeonja (Black Gun – medium-ranged, anti-Cavalry), and Hwangja (Yellow Gun – medium-ranged, anti-Infantry), each possessing special attack bonuses at certain distances and against certain units (perhaps instead there can be one Chongtong cannon, beginning as the Yellow Gun, which can be upgraded to the other guns, and include the bonuses of the previous guns as stances, like the Turtle Ship; this will prevent the Korean from having 7 different Artillery units), as well as Petards, Hwacha, and Hongyipao, a heavy anti-Artillery cannon (a heavy, slow Culverin). Korean Infantry include Gakgung, Fire Lancers (Pikemen with a short-ranged flamethrower attack) and Hand Cannoneer- and Halberdier-type units. “Eruptor” increases all Artillery and Hand Cannoneer-type unit attack. Petard speed can be upgraded, and Petards can be garrisoned in War Wagons. The Korean have no devoted Musketeer unit, though the Fire Lancer acts as a functional Pikeman in melee combat, and his flamethrower attack fares well against other Infantry. The Gakgung fulfill the anti-Infantry role of Skirmisher-type units, do reasonably well from a distance against Cavalry, and are among the most powerful archers in the game, with a range comparable to the Arrow Knight. Korean Naval units include Fishing Boats, Panokseon, Turtle Ships, and Junks. Korean Cavalry include War Wagons, Cavalry Archers … Most of the Korean Cavalry must be shipped from the Home City. The Korean can send shipments of Palace Guards, elite halberdier-type units, which can mount and dismount, like Partyzants. Rather than a Monk, the Korean begin games with a Royal Surveyor, a mounted Bureaucrat who has a build speed increase aura; Royal Surveyors can be killed, and replacements must be shipped from the Home City. The Korean can also ship (or begin games with) an Exiled Monk or Seon Monk; these pedestrian wanderers can serve as weak Monks who cannot come near Korean Town Centers, pass through Korean Gates, or garrison Korean ships or buildings (this reflects the suppression of religions aside from Neo-Confucianism during the Joseon Dynasty). Exiled Monks have a very small Line of Sight when moving. Exiled Monks have a Meditation stance which heals the Monk quickly and sequentially expands his Line of Sight until it is very great (like Atlantean Oracles in Age of Mythology), and which can be upgraded. Exiled Monks are not revivable, but replacements can be shipped with the card “Exile a Monk”. Exiled Monk upgrades are researched on the Monk’s person, and are only available for research and use while he is in the Meditation stance. “Clairvoyance” allows the player, while the Exiled Monk is meditating, to view any card currently being shipped, and to which players they are being delivered. “Nirvana” gives Exiled Monks a Nirvana ability, which reveals the entire map, lifting black map and fog of war, for a few moments, during which the Monk is invulnerable. However, Exiled Monks are armed only with a walking stick. Exiled Monks can convert Treasure Guardians. The “Righteous Monk” turns the Exiled Monk into a Righteous Monk, greatly increasing his combat abilities, giving him a Stealth ability, allowing him to build Trading Posts and train Guerilla Monks – armed Disciples with a Stealth ability and a healing aura). “Gungdo” increases the attack of Gakgung. “Salvage Crews” allows the Korean to receive back a portion of the Wood cost of any Korean Naval units that are destroyed. “Repurpose Materials” allows the Korean to receive back a portion of the Wood cost of any Korean structure that is destroyed. Fishing Boats can repair other Naval units. The Korean have a lower maximum population than other Civilizations, but Korean Peasants’ proficiency at different tasks remains even after they have been retasked, resulting in a multitalented workforce. “Seowon” increases the training time of Bureaucrats, but also increases their stats, upgrading them to Scholars who can research technologies on their person. “Yangban” allows Bureaucrats to generate a tiny trickle of Coin through their tasks. “Hyangyak” allows Villages to train Gakgung, Irregulars, and Peasants, gives Villages a ranged attack, gives Villages a gather rate and attack and resistance increase aura, and increases the amount of population supported by Villages. “Silhak Reforms” allows Bureaucrats to gather resources and construct Villages, increases Peasant hitpoints, and decreases the costs of Villages and Rice Paddies. The “Byeolgigun” card reorganizes the Korean military to train Riflemen instead of Gakgung and Gatling Guns instead of Hwacha. “Myunjebaegab Vest” gives all Infantry and Cavalry great resistance to musket and rifle fire. “Seodang” increases Peasant hitpoints and attack, and allows Villages to train Peasants very quickly. “Confucian Society” emphasizes the honor due to superiors, causing Bureaucrats to give a gather rate increase to Peasants, and Peasants in turn to do the same to Slaves. In the Industrial Age, the “Peasant Uprising” card transforms all Peasants into Irregulars and allows Irregulars to gather resources. Individual Korean military units grow in veterancy versus specific kinds of units, slowly gaining attack and resistance bonuses versus various different kinds of armies. “Home Front” gives Irregulars and Peasants an attack increase when in the vicinity of friendly buildings. Korean Artillery is trained at Royal Foundries which can be tasked to automatically produce any Artillery, similarly to a European Factory. The Korean can ship Castles in the Discovery Age, and all Castle and Wall upgrades are available an Age early. The “Artillery Regiments” card allows Artillery to be trained with clusters of units, like a Banner Army, to defend it, with the units chosen differing with each Artillery piece and adding to the cost and train time. For example, one Hwacha would be accompanied by a small number of Fire Lancers; Petards would be trained in clusters with a War Wagon. The Korean are specially suited for turtling, though that is not their only option. The Korean have a lower maximum population than other Civilizations, but their Artillery also takes up less population on average, and their units are more versatile. The “Imjin Wars” card increases the stats of Hwacha, Gakgung, Irregulars, and Turtle Ships. The “Admiral Yi” card decreases the population cost of warships, increases their speed, and replaces the “Admiralty” card. Like the Chinese, the Korean Peasants can worship at Korean Temples to garner XP. The Korean cannot build Trading Posts until the Colonial Age, and then only with Bureaucrats. In general, the Korean are a resilient, defensive, archer, Naval, and Artillery Civilization. Best Units: Gakgung, Chongtong, Turtle Ship. Building Set: East Asian.



This is the idea I'm least confident in, but the idea interested me and seemed to fit this civ well...
Persian
Spoiler:

The Persian leader is Nadir Shah. The Persian Monk is a Sheik: a fast scimitar-wielding warlord on foot. Persian Cavalry includes Khorasan Riders (light auxiliary ranged Cavalry armed with muskets), Persian Lancers (anti-Cavalry hand Cavalry), and Afghan Riders (heavy hand Cavalry armed with scimitars); Persian Lancers can be upgraded to Royal Riders, generally the best well-rounded Cavalry in the game. Persian Artillery includes Zamburak (swivel guns mounted on camels), Naffatun (Grenadiers) Petards, Mysorean Rockets (short-ranged rockets), and Mortar- and Falconet-type units. Instead of Markets, the Persians construct Bazaars, which amplify all resource gathering, generate a trickle of XP, and can be packed up into wagons and deployed elsewhere; Bazaars amplify resources more or less depending on their proximity to resource-gathering Villagers. Tribal system – Sheiks are surrounded by a tribe of Villagers who will automatically follow the Sheik and gather resources, and fight alongside him when he engages in combat; any Livestock they have picked up, as well as their tents, will move along with them; most upgrades pertaining to Villagers and housing are researched on the Sheik’s person. In addition to these tribes, which begin small but increase in size as time goes on and each gather sufficient resources, there is the “Imperial” side of the Civilization, consisting of the Town Center, Emirs, Barracks, Consulates, Strongholds, and the like. The Town Center and buildings like it improve the tribal system by unifying it, strengthening them and their ability to work together, to defend themselves, and so on. Basically, the Persian Civilization relies on groups of Villagers rather than individuals, which are connected to the player through the warlord unit known as the Sheik (about on par with condottieri and daimyo); aside from this they are not wholly different from others. This is meant to represent the necessity of the Persian government ruling mainly through local tribal leaders, with all the benefits and difficulties found in such a system. Eventually, i.e. after the Discovery Age, Sheiks and their tribes can actually settle in villages, which hold to the same principles but are immobile; these are treated as one whole structure, though Livestock may be tasked on it as well as Coin, Wood, and Food gathered at and around it. The Sheik’s person as well as the Villagers defend their villages, and it is through the Sheik that the “focus” on Wood, Coin, or Food is commanded. This is meant to be imprecise, but also do away for the most part with any economic micromanaging; especially because, as time goes on, these villages will rely less on the resources around them and will begin to become self-sufficient. This means that, for the most part, construction of buildings will rely on teams of Villagers. Thus the Persian military will consist of Sheiks and their personal armies, alongside the Imperial troops which are actively trained and manipulated by the player. Imperial troops consist mainly of Cavalry and Artillery, along with the standard Archer Infantry unit and Tofangdi Musketeers.



At this point I think they would probably make a better super-native, but...
Incan
Spoiler:

The Inca Ruler is either Huayna Capac or Atahualpa. Like the Aztec, the Inca have the choice either to advance to the Imperial Age as their own Civilization, or to undergo Requerimiento and become the Viceroyalty of Peru, a hybrid Inca/Spanish Civilization. The Incan Kamayuk is a very long-ranged Pikeman, deadly against Cavalry, but extremely vulnerable to ranged Infantry and Artillery. Kamayuk range is such that three or four layers of Kamayuk can strike the same unit at once. The Slinger is a ranged Infantry unit with pierce and crush damage and very light armor; they are most effective in large numbers giving cover to hand infantry and archers. The Inca begin games with a Warchief and a Chasqis – a fast, unarmed Native Scout. All Incan units are faster and all Coin costs are relatively low. Other Incan Infantry units include the Antisuyu Bowman, the Bolas Warrior, the Chanca Macana, and the Estolica (spear-throwers). Bolas Warriors are ranged Infantry whose attack both damages and slows down enemy units. Chanca Macana are mace-wielding melee Infantry which deal large amounts of crush damage. The Inca begin games with a few Alpacas, and can breed Alpacas. The Inca skip the Industrial Age. “Hatun Runa Mit’a” allows Runas and Houses to give a proximity-based hitpoint and performance bonus to military units. Incan Priests give a large performance boost to Warchiefs. Incan Priests can slaughter Livestock or Slaves to increase the performance of all military units on the map. “Battle Spells” causes Incan Priests to decrease the stats of nearby enemy military units. Incan Villagers are Runas, good resource gatherers but slow and with few hitpoints. The “Kuraka” card allows multiple Warchiefs to be trained, one for each Incan Town Center and each allied Native settlement, and allows Warchiefs to train Infantry. “Sapa Inca Guard” increases the stats of all Incan Infantry, and delivers a mixed company of military units. “Ayllu Organization” reorganizes the Inca army, allowing the training of Banner Armies rather than individual units. In general, the Inca rely on large armies of lightly armored, fast Infantry, especially under heavy arrow and sling cover.



New Natives

Spoiler:

Tibetan Monastery – a monastery hidden deep in the Himalayas. “Dzang Architecture” upgrades Castles, Outposts, Blokchouses, Walls, and War Huts, changing their stats and aesthetics, and ships a Castle Rickshaw.
Italian Cities – towns scattered throughout the Italian countryside. Trading Posts built here may upgrade the fortifications of the town itself, turning it into a citadel, making it progressively harder for the towns to change hands as the game goes on. They can also be upgraded to have cannon defenses, and allow the allied player to train Italian units.

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TrollPrinceBilly XVII
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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 11:13 pm    Post subject:

Dude as a longtime lurker i can saftely say one thing.

Aint no body on this forum gonna try and reply to all of that. Nobody.

Chop it up and make it multiple posts over some time, guarantees a reply and that people dont simply ignore it as a knee-jerk reaction to that much writing.

Good stuff though.
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theyseemeroland
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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 11:34 pm    Post subject:

Sounds good, thanks for the tip. Had a sneaking suspicion it was too much at once. Not sure how to delete this topic though.
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PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2016 12:03 am    Post subject:

Dont worry about deleting it, it will be useful as a referance in the other posts.

Besides i could be wrong and one of the admins may choose to respond to it all in one post. Unlikely, but possible.
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PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2016 9:01 am    Post subject:

I'm in a hurry, so I'll just say this: Please don't open new topics, but care to properly format your massive post with all the tools available to create some sort of readability. Use spoilers for big chunk of texts, do line breaks and care to add headings for each section.
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theyseemeroland
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2016 8:52 pm    Post subject:

I've edited the post as much as I can at the moment. If anyone has any comments, just be sure to name whichever part you're interested in talking about. But I am very interested in hearing feedback!
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Alain Magnan
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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2016 11:35 am    Post subject:

Love it! Just a few things... Mines? Saw those mentioned, how would they work? Also certain units run the risk of becoming overpowered... Shinobi is the main one i saw as being overly powerful.
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theyseemeroland
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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2016 6:28 pm    Post subject:

Mines I'm not sure technically how they would work... I was imagining a tiny invisible and permeable building that would have a trigger area... there's already the Artillery Depot structure which I believe explodes when destroyed and deals damage in its vicinity. Maybe we could fiddle with that? I know next to nothing about technical modding though.

Speaking of which, I realized as I was looking back through that some of the Shinobi's powers probably won't be technically possible, i.e. scaling buildings and cliffs. Probably the next best thing would be to allow him to pass through walls, though that may be OP. The idea is to limit the role of the Shinobi but make him damn good at what he does. But I admit some of the abilities in tandem with each other would be too much. This is why I don't want the Japanese Monk units to have any kind of aura bonus to pile on top of those of Shoguns, Daimyo, and the Shogunate.

On the topic of the Japanese, I envision some Civs, namely the Chinese and Iroquois, having certain structures to restrict special abilities which often make the Japanese overpowered. The Iroquois could build a Totem and the Chinese could build Guard Lion Statues (or any other kind of monument... Bodhisattvas, Confucius, etc.). Each of these would forbid special abilities, both those of units and of Wonders, in their immediate vicinity. They would have to be strictly limited in number. They could also serve as scouting structures, sort of like the Priest's Obelisk in AOM.

In turn Japanese Shrines could have a no-combat zone around them, meaning they'd have to be attacked with archers or Artillery. Makes sense for Shinto holy sites.
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Zooasaurus
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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2016 1:51 pm    Post subject:

For the Ottomans, i think instead of Saloon, they need some kind of consulate where they can get troops and bonuses from vassals they had atm like Moldavia, Barbary States, Egypt etc
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Alain Magnan
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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2016 2:20 pm    Post subject:

Are you seeing Persia as an Asian Switzerland? That seems like it would fit. FYI, more NE 2 swiss then NE 3 swiss. The one with the free villagers. Sort of a mobile civilisation....
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PostPosted: Tue May 31, 2016 7:58 pm    Post subject:

Well that seems kind of incorrect in a way, I mean I know that Persia was famous for nomads but by the time of the Safavids they were sedentary, many great cities and bazaars and what not were built by the Persians and really the nomadic roots were beginning to fade out though they could still be seen
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theyseemeroland
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2016 3:22 am    Post subject:

I had a similar feeling that this kind of gameplay might be out of date by the late game, which is why I (I think) mentioned that these mobile tribes can be permanently settled into structures after the first Age. If nothing else, it would certainly mix up the opening moves of the game... But I like it for the Persians. I'd honestly rather hear whether this idea works gameplay-wise instead of historically though, since it doesn't necessarily have to be the Persians... it could even work historically for a reworking of the Sioux.
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Makedonia
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:27 am    Post subject:

These edits seem more appropriate for a Age of Imperialism mod rather than a Napoleonic Era mod.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 02, 2016 12:40 pm    Post subject:

Makedonia could you explain what you mean exactly? Other than the "Berlin Conference" tech at the Capitol, I don't think that much here breaks the Napoleonic Era timeline.
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