Spanish units and uniforms 1470-1840 and related musings
Go to page 1, 2  Next
 
   Forum Index -> NE Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:39 am    Post subject: Spanish units and uniforms 1470-1840 and related musings

Hello everybody, after a long time considering and lurking I decided to reinstall AoE3 and test the mod. I played with Spanish, Ottomans, Polish, Japanese and French so far.

So I think the Spanish are mostly unchanged from the vanilla version but that the mod team intends to modify them more or less fully in the long term (in another 10 years I suppose lol ), right? And there is an intention to reduce the current focus on the time of (early) American conquest and the Reformation, and make it look like they can advance towards the Napoleonic Wars time as they age up instead of being still stuck fighting with swords, pikes and plate armor while building trains and factories. With the idea of maybe in the far, far future having a full blown campaign set around the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars where the Spanish are a playable faction.

I presume that part of the reason they were put in the backburner is because the team is mostly German and there was trouble finding information on Spanish units. If that's the case, this post should be of help.

http://alcantara.forogratis.es/uniformologia-militar-del-ejercito-espanol-t404.html

Due credit goes to Bona and his Spanish Army forum. I will share the images and translate the parts that are relevant to AoE3 and NE's timeline, and include my own comments if you don't mind.

To be continued
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 11:39 am    Post subject:

The Reign of the Catholic Monarchs: 1469-1518

This era corresponds technically with AoE3's Discovery Age, where no units can be created. But...

Bona writes:

Quote:

[...] when the Royal Cedula of January 15, 1488 creates the Troops of the Santa Hermandad [lit. "Holy Brotherhood"], they were uniformed with white tunics and a red cross on their chest; the Santa Hermandad was the first permanent force in Spain, both of military and police nature, since it was tasked with the safety of the country and highways in time of peace.

The Santa Hermandad was integrated by 10,000 men divided in 12 captaincies and each captaincy was made of 720 lancers and 80 espingarderos [armed with a espingarda, a long hand cannon or primitive arquebus], and led by 24 cuadrilleros [lit. "small group leaders"], also including 8 drummers and one standard bearer.

Besides this permanent force, there was another called "Los acostamientos", [lit. "the laying-downs"] a sort of provincial militia that was called upon only in time of war. They wore no uniforms, but because they were made of men from the same region or area they appeared to be "semi-uniformed."

Spoiler:



We could say this was the first uniform in the Spanish Army.




At times, the Santa Hermandad (lit. "Holy Brotherhood") has been reputed to be both the first professional, national army in Spain and the first national police force in Europe. While recruits were provided and armed by the towns, they answered only to the Crown and were an important tool in taking power away from the local feudal lords and concentrating it in the monarch. They were created in the immediate aftermath of the War of Castilian Succession (1475-1479) in which most of the high, feudal aristocracy supported Juana la Beltraneja against Isabella and Ferdinand, while the towns and cities largely fought for them. The Hermandad's role was as much to fight roving highwaymen as it was to fight raiders raised by aristocrats to raid the lands of their enemies. They apparently did that a lot in the reigns preceding Isabella's, since all kings of the Trastamara dynasty except her were incredibly weak.

It was a long-lived force, being only disbanded in 1834. Unsurprisingly, its weapons and uniforms varied over time. While early specifications made them wear white and red, over time they came to use green shirts with overcoats. This became so iconic that they survive in the Spanish idiom equivalent for "Now you tell me" - A buenas horas, mangas verdes ("In good time, green sleeves"). More negative was its imprint in the Spanish Low Countries, where Hermandad is still used today as a slur for the police.

Spoiler:

Another early depiction, including a espingardero


Hermandad mounted lancer


And later examples with green sleeves from the 1500s and 1600s:



Quote:
The cavalry had a permanent force as well: The Guardias Viejas de Castilla (lit. "Castile's Old Guards"), organized on 2 May 1493, after the conquest of Granada. This force had 2,500 horsemen, each divided in 25 companies of 100 members. Each company had a captain, a lieutenant and an ensing to bear the standard, along with one or two trumpets. The fifth part of each company was made of light horsemen and the rest by men-at-arms, wearing heavy armor and with covered horses showing the castles and lions of the royal arms.

Besides this force, the Catholic Monarchs relied on the Halberdier Corps (1504) for the guard and custody of Don Fernando, and the Monteros de Espinosa ("Espinosa Hunters") (Infantry), Burgundy Archers (Cavalry) and a Swiss Guard for Queen Isabella that did not last long.

Spoiler:


From left to right:
- Santa Hermandad pikeman; 1488.
- Santa Hermandad espingardero; 1488.
- Crossbowman of the Acostamientos of León
- Burgundy Archer; 1502.
- Halberdier Guard of Ferdinand "the Catholic"; 1504.
- Espinosa Hunter; 1498.
- Swiss halberdier; 1486.


Espinosa is a town in the mountainous northern part of Burgos province, more or less the craddle of the county (later kingdom) of Castile.

Quote:

Spoiler:


From left to right:
- City or town retinue crossbowman.
- Royal retinue espingardero; 1493.
- Lord's retinue cetrato [from Latin caetratus, "shield-bearer"]; 1493.
- [Cardinal] Cisneros's Troops cetrato; 1509.
- Infantry Sergeant; 1509.
- Shotgunner; 1509.

Spoiler:


From left to right:
- Light horseman of the Old Guards of Castile; 1493.
- Pikeman of Cardinal Cisneros's Expeditionary Troops; 1509.
- Man-at-Arms of the Old Guards of Castile; 1493.
- Stradiot; 1507.
- Mounted Shotgunner; 1509.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 1:50 pm    Post subject:

The Colonial Age:

The reign of Charles I; 1518-1556

Quote:

When the Emperor Charles arrived in Spain he found a magnificient army of nearly 32,000 men, most of whom were volunteers. The king ordered that his troops were uniformed with German-style uniforms, but in national colors, red and yellow, and that their weapons be the same for all and made of bascinet, full cuirass, tassets, couters and arm armor and metal shield for the defense, and pike and sword for the offense.

In 1534 the Spanish infantry was organized in "tercios" [thirds], made each of 3,000 men led by a field marshal. Each tercio had 12 companies usually, of which four were arquebusiers and the rest pikemen. Every four companies made a coronelía led by a colonel. In 1536 the peninsular army reached a strength of 67,143 men of which 7,120 were cavalry.

The Royal Guard was composed at the beginning of Charles I's reign by the Old Guards of Castile, the Company of Halberdiers, the Burgundy Archers and the Stradiots, but over the years it was changed to the Old Guard (made of the wounded and crippled[?]) and the German Guard, which was imported from Germany in 1519.

The cavalry consisted of the "Cien Continuos" (Continuous Hundred), the Stradiots, and the Archers of Burgundy.

Spoiler:


Page, Herald and Royal Guards.

Spoiler:


General, Sergeant and Pikeman.

Spoiler:


Ensign, Crossbowman and Arquebusier or Musketeer.

Spoiler:


Pikeman, Piper and Drummer.

Spoiler:


Left to right:
- Man-at-Arms of the "Ordinance Bands".
- Guard of the "Continuous Hundred".
- Cavalry trumpeteer.

Spoiler:


Left to right:
- Landsknecht arquebusier
- Spanish Guard.
- Burgundy Archer.
- German Guard Halberdier.


(Charles had the Burgundy Archers changed from bowmen to pikemen, but he kept the name; that particular type of spear was called "Archa" as a result, instead of the soldier being named for the weapon as is usual)

Quote:

Spoiler:


Left to right:
- Infantry drummer.
- Infantry piper.
- Infantry sergeant.
- Infantry pikeman.
- Arquebusier.
- General.



The reign of Philip II; 1556-1598

Quote:

In 1591, the infantry was reduced to 19,000 men, grouped in the tercios. The cavalry was divided in this time in four institutions: Men-at-Arms, Light Horsemen, Mounted Arquebusiers and Herreruelos (lit. "Little Irons"), 9,260 riders in total.

In 1562, [Philip II] organized the Provintial Militias, made of civilians who were taught to handle and use weapons and who had some privileges because they were in the service of the Crown.

The Royal Guard continued to be integrated by the Spanish Guard, Old and New, the German or Tedeschian Guard, the Company of Guard Stradiots and the Archers of Burgundy.

Spoiler:


- Coselete [I believe the literal translation is "Breastplate"]
- Musketeer
- Drummer.
- Garrison Musketeer; 1567.

Spoiler:


- Man-at-Arms.
- Trumpeteer of the Companies of Men-at-Arms.
- Mounted Arquebusier.
- Herreruelo, 1560.
- Herreruelo Captain.

Spoiler:


- Spanish Guard halberdier.
- Tedeschian Guard halberdier.
- Burgundy Archer.
- Guard Stradiot.
- Simple pikeman, 1590.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2017 9:41 am    Post subject:

The Fortress Age:

Quote:
The reign of Philip III; 1598-1621

The Royal Guard continued to be made by the Companies of Halberdiers of the Spanish Guard (Old and New) and the German or Tedeschian Guard. The cavalry continued to be made of the Company of Stradiots and the Company of Archers of the Blade [full name of the corps formerly known as Archers of Burgundy]. The uniform of these companies remained the traditional bright yellow or white, but the cut changed [not very relevant stuff]. The infantry, like the rest of the army, suffered the consequences of the decadence and general corruption and the troops resorted to sacking and pillaging because of the lack of pay.

In 1603 there was an attempt to reorganize the army by dividing it in two large sections: [the] Peninsular Army and the Flanders one.

In relation to the Provintial Militias there were two resolutions in 1609 and 1620 with the aim of putting order in the instruction and leadership. In regards to uniforms, it could be said they were non-existent, [because] if the King could not pay his soldiers even less [he could] provide them with suits or uniforms. For this reason, everyone dressed like he could and with more or less luxuries depending of his luck in combat or gambling.

The most common garment was the "herreruelo", a sort of small cape with open sleeves resembling fins, that was usually worn over the doublet. The breeches were the most varied. The rapier was generalized, both by pikemen and by arquebusiers or musketeers. The pikemen or coseletes abandoned some of their traditional armor and used only breastplate, backplate and bascinet, disregarding arm armor and taces.

The cavalry did not suffer changes, excluding the Men-at-Arms who received small, purple Brandenburger-type capes with the cross of Burgundy over their chest and back.

In this reign, the embedded sash [?] was generalized among officers, both in infantry as in cavalry. This sash could be tied to the waist or like a bandolier, crossing the chest from right to left.

Spoiler:


From left to right:
- Man-at-Arms of the Line Cavalry
- Mounted Arquebusier Officer
- Ensign of an Infantry Tercio
- Cuirassier, 1601
- Cuirassier Trumpet

Spoiler:


- Walloon Musketeer
- Arquebusier
- Pikeman
- Infantry drummer
- Captain of the Flanders Tercios.

The reign of Philip IV; 1621-1665

[...] In 1632 the slashed breeches were sustitued by "gregesco" shorts in yellow and [also introduced were] the half breeches with embedded worsted and the cow hide shoe in this natural color, tied with a large, red ribbon; every soldier also received a yellow doublet with long tails and the "hungarina" or small cape with open sleeves, but this time made in an uniform fashion from brown colored cloth. The headpiece was a Walloon-style hat topped by red feathers. The coseletes received the arm armor and taces, and also iron gauntlets. Saddlebags were introduced.

In 1652 the uniform's colors changed, leaving the soldier with a full brown uniform and the bandana jerkin was introduced to protect the uniform from the wearing down of the bandoliers and the embedded ribbons in the shoes were eliminated.

The cavalry substitued the heavy lances for two pistols and a rapier. It lost most of its armor, leaving the horsemen with breast and backplate only.

Spoiler:


- Dragoon
- General
- Ensign of the King's Guard's Coronelía
- Carbineer

Spoiler:


- Line Infantry Pikeman; 1632
- Infantry Arquebusier; 1632
- Cuirassier
- Infantry Officer
- Infantry Drummer
- Arquebusier; 1652

Spoiler:


- Pikeman of the King's Guard's Coronelía
- Musketeer of the King's Guard's Coronelía
- Mounted Company of the King's Guard's Coronelía
- Halberdier of the Royal Guard's Spanish Company
- Archer of the Blade serving as an orderly.

The reign of Charles II; 1665-1700

[...] The Infantry wardrobe went through great changes in 1693 because they were assigned French-style uniforms, adopting the redingot or "justacorps", long and with great bends in the wristbands and the front forming lapels, and with side pockets. This new wardrobe included the following garments:
- Jacket with gergilla [?] lined with linen [duh]
- Two linen shirts
- Two bocadillo [?] ties
- A couple of stockings
- A sword belt
- A "Schomberg style" white hat
- A couple of cowhide shoes
- A couple of espadrilles (for the marches)

The dress coat of each tercio had a different color which in turn earned them a popular nickname.

Permanent Provincial Tercios (Old):
- Tercio of Seville: purple coat and flesh colored underside
- Tercio of Valladolid: green coat and white underside
- Tercio of Burgos: yellow coat and white underside
- Tercio of Toledo: blue coat and white underside
- Tercio of Madrid: flesh-colored coat and blue underside
- Tercio of Segovia: white insignia and underside

In 1694, 10 tercios were created to reinforce the existing ones and were called "the new ones".

Permanent provincial tercios (New):
- Tercio of Burgos: indigo blue coat
- Tercio of Valladolid: emerald green coat
- Tercio of Cuenca: bottle green coat
- Tercio of León: yellow coat
- Tercio of Murcia: sky blue coat
- Tercio of Sevilla: flesh colored coat
- Tercio of Gibraltar: fire colored coat
- Tercio of Jaén: rat hair colored coat [Topmodel]
- Tercio of Toledo: purple coat
- Tercio of Segovia: silver coat

Cavalry also received long dress coats with large bends and lapels, but they were the same color in all regiments: yellow with flesh-colored underside.

Spoiler:


- Arquebusier of the "Old Greens" Tercio
- Drummer of the "Old Blues" Tercio
- Ensign of the Provincial Tercio of Seville
- Grenadier of the Provincial Tercio of Murcia

Spoiler:


- Spanish Guard Halberdier
- Tedeschian Guard Halberdier
- Captain General
- Major Sergeant of the Tercio of Jaén
- Pikeman of the "Old Reds" Tercio

Spoiler:


- Guard Stradiot
- Guard Cavalry Regiment
- Dragoon Regiment drummer
- Dragoon
- Mounted Cuirassier

Spoiler:


Arquebusier Dragoon of Sheldon's Tercio; 1685


According to [https://www.leagueofaugsburg.com/fightingtalk/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=7161&start=0], Sheldon was an exiled Irish count who commanded a Tercio in Milan but his troops were Italian and/or Spanish. Sheldon's Tercio was the forerunner of the later Hussars of Pavia.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Tue Dec 26, 2017 9:51 am    Post subject:

The Industrial Age, Part I:

Quote:

The reign of Philip V; 1700-1746

With the arrival of Philip V, the whole army was reorganized and reformed in the French manner. A [new] hyerarchy of officers was created [and] the weapons were made better. The Tercio name was changed to Regiment.

Uniforms suffered a radical change, adopting the French dress coat [and] the hat was replaced by the tricorne with a rosette in the national red color. Hair was ordered to be tied behind in a leather bag for better hygiene and cleanliness of the uniform. The cartridges were worn on the belt, excluding grenadiers who continued using the bandolier. These were also given a flat hat [that was] more comfy and practical for their work.

In the first years of the reign each Tercio continued to use their traditional dress coat colors, but in 1708 white was adopted for all infantry and cavalry, reducing the regiment's distinctive colors to the cuffs, lining and undershirt. The stockings were white for all except the grenadiers who wore red ones. The white leggings buttoned on one side were introduced in 1717 and would remain in use for the rest of the century. In 1734 all soldiers were ordered to tidy up the tails of the coats to make marching easier and have more freedom of movement.

Dragoons were given green uniforms and tall flat hats with the corresponding insignia.

Artillery troops appeared in 1701 and were given the Royal House uniform, i.e. blue with red underside, with golden buttons and braids. Engineers wore the same uniform but with silver buttons and braids. [...]

In 1718 the Dragoons colors changed, returning to the dress coat in yellow, and the color of the regiment in the lapels. The large hat was replaced by the tricorne, although in 1728 it was replaced again by a bearskin round cap.

In 1734 the provincial regiments were also uniformed in white, distinguising among themselves by the use of ties or black napkins hanging over their chest.

Spoiler:


Pikeman (1703), Colonel and Fusilier

Spoiler:


Arquebusier, Fusilier and Grenadier

Spoiler:


- Captain General
- Officer serving a Captain General
- Sapper in work uniform; 1710
- Royal Artillery Corps Officer; 1710

Spoiler:


- Fusilier of the "Old Reds" Tercio; 1701-1707
- Grenadier of the "Old Yellows" Tercio; 1701-1707
- Drummer of the "Old Greens" Tercio; 1701-1707
- Officer of the "Old Purples" Tercio; 1701-1707
- Grenadier of the Spanish Royal Guards
- Musketeer of the King's Guard; 1700-1703

Spoiler:


- Dragoon of the Valanzat Tercio; 1703-1718
- Line Cavalry, Nestien Regiment; 1702-1728
- Royal Guardia de Corps, Flemish Company; 1703
- Cuirassier of the Royal German Regiment; 1735
- Death Hussar; 1705


As far as I know, the Guardia de Corps directly replaced and unified the Old Guards of Castile and the Archers of Burgundy.

Quote:
Spoiler:


- Line Infantry Officer, Extremadura Regiment; 1718-1834 [obviously a typo - 1734]
- Grenadier of the Irish Regiment Hibernia; 1732
- Mountain Fusilier; 1735
- Line Cavalry, Farnesio Regiment; 1728
- Drummer of the Sagunto Dragoon Regiment; 1707-1718
- Dragoon of the Almansa Regiment; 1718-1728

Spoiler:


- First Regiment of Spanish Hussars; 1742-1747
- Captain of the Belgia Dragoon Regiment; 1740-1760
- Ensign of the Cádiz Infantry Regiment; 1732
- Pavia Dragoons; 1728

Spoiler:


- Royal Walloon Infantry Guards officer; 1718
- Royal Spanish Infantry Guards grenadier; 1718
- Mounted Grenadiers Brigade; 1732-1748
- Royal Halberdier Guards; 1718
- Fusilier of the Line Regiment España; 1707-1718

Spoiler:


Ensign of the Cantabria Regiment, 1737. This regiment was dispatched to recover the Sacramento Colony in Uruguay from the Portuguese.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Tue Dec 26, 2017 6:20 pm    Post subject:

The Industrial Age, Part II:

Quote:

The reign of Ferdinand VI; 1746-1759

During this reign the troop uniforms underwent little changes [...] The most notable was the return of the belly cartridge or "cacerina" for the Infantry and the introduction of the "tontillo", a frame that hollowed the folds of the coat tails and, we assume, was only used in ceremonies. [The] dress coats and breeches of all regiments were white, with the color of the underside in the wristbands and the undershirt in some regiments, and likewise in the collar of the dress coats.

The cavalry [mostly] retained the uniforms of the previous reign, but some received blue dress coats that differed in the color of the underside that appeared on the lapels, undershirt and breeches of the uniforms and the gun holsters, saddle blanket and bag.

All dragoons were made to wear a white braid on the edge of the undershirt, and the grenadiers to wear a braid of silver wire on the cuffs, and also tall hats with flat fronts [...]

The Artillery continued to use long leggings of white linen from 1750 [...]

Spoiler:


- Royal Carbineer Brigade
- Drummer of the Royal Spanish Guards
- Grenadier of the Royal Walloon Guards
- Lieutenant General in dress uniform

Spoiler:


- Royal Artillery Regiment
- Piper of the Royal Walloon Guards
- Officer of the Royal Guardias de Corps
- Officer of the Royal Engineer Corps
- Sergeant of the Permanent Oran [Algeria] Regiment; 1758
- Fusilier of the Old Reding [Swiss] Regiment; 1758
- Grenadier of the Navarre Regiment; 1750

Spoiler:


- Drummer of the Royal Carbineers
- Trumpeteer of the Royal Guardias de Corps
- Ensign of the Royal Spanish Guards
- Officer of the Barcelona Line Cavalry Regiment
- Soldier of the Calatrava Line Cavalry Regiment; 1750

The reign of Charles III; 1759-1788

In this reign, the Army underwent drastic changes in organization, armament and clothing, mostly due to the ordinance of 1768 which superseeded all existing ones before that moment. [...] Sergeants continued to carry halberds [until] 1787 [when] it was decided that [they] abandon them and wear also belt, cartridge and rifle like the Troop.

Infantry
The Uniforms of the Line Infantry continued to be white for the Spanish, Italian and Walloon regiments; blue for the Swiss and flesh-colored for the Irish, with each regiment continuing to use its particular underside. [...] 1775 saw the introduction of a new headwear called "feather cap" which consisted of a black felt helmet with plush fringe and brass crest, with a flat front bearing the Royal Arms and red plume on the left side. The hairstyle was simplified, with only one curl on each side of the head. In 1776 the Troops were given a barracks dress consisting of a white undershirt with collar and cuffs of the corresponding undershirt. This was accompanied by a barracks cap in white color with folds and the undershirt's bright color. In 1778 white colored capes for the Troop were adopted [...] On 16 September 1782 the helmet or feather cap was abolished, returning to the sombrero acandilado or tricorne.

Cavalry
The dress suits were complimented with lapels on the undershirt's color and sabre ropes in the same color. The dress coat tails were tidied up, cartridge belts hanging from yellow buckskin belts that crossed the chest with another that served as carbine holder; to ride they used buckskin breeches in the natural color, white covers and rigid, black leather boots. In 1780 it was ordered that cartridge belts were wrapped in the undershirt's color with the Royal Arms sewn over them and a filleting [?] on the edge of the button's color.

Dragoons
Their wardrobe suffered no changes, but their hats were replaced in 1780 by tall cilinder caps, with visor and a long black cover for the back of the neck, their forehead was adorned with a tall plush front of the same color, in whose center there was a brass shield with the Royal Arms and some trophies with the motto of the regiment, on the left side there was a plum of red bristle.

Spoiler:


Royal Forest Ranger; 1761

Spoiler:


- Officer of the Lombardy Line Infantry Regiment; 1768-1775
- Sapper of the Castile Line Infantry Regiment; 1768-1775
- Drummer of the Savoy Line Infantry Regiment; 1768-1775
- Major Drummer of the Granada Line Infantry Regiment; 1768-1775
- Fusilier Corporal of the Galicia Line Infantry Regiment; 1775-1782
- Grenadier Sergeant of the Brussels Line Infantry Regiment in dress uniform; 1775
- Volunteer Light Infantry Regiment of Catalonia; 1762-1775

Spoiler:


- Standard-bearer of the Flemish Company of the Royal Guardias de Corps
- Grenadier of the Royal Spanish and Walloon Guards
- Soldier of the Line Cavalry Regiment España
- Standard-bearer of the Prince's Line Cavalry Regiment

Spoiler:


- Pavia Regiment Dragoon; 1784
- Captain General in dress uniform
- Ensign of the Royal Artillery Regiment
- Royal Assistant
- Spanish Volunteer Light Cavalry Regiment; 1766

Spoiler:


- Ensign of the Provincial Cavalry's Third Company, "Volunteers of the Philippines"; 1763
- Havana Free Black Company; 1763
- Havana White Militia Battallion; 1763
- [Mexican] Veracruz Lancer; 1767

Spoiler:


- Pasig Cavalry Company; Philippines, 1780
- Officer of the Battallion of Whites of Natá [Panama]; 1785
- Black Militia of Puerto Rico; 1785
- Cavalry Squadron of Puerto Rico; 1785
- Black Company of the Santo Domingo Militia; 1780
- Provincial Militias of New Spain [Mexico]; 1795
- "Cuera" ["Leather Cover"] Dragoon of the [North American] Frontier; 1795

Spoiler:


- Batan Archers; Philippines, 1780
- Free Black Company of the Veracruz Militia; 1776
- Count of Jala's Mexican Trade Company; 1740
- Artillery Company Officer of the Militia of Potosí [High Peru / Modern Bolivia]; 1781
- Frontier "Blandengue" [lit. "wimpy, pushover"], Viceroyalty of the River Plate [Argentina]; 1780
- Drummer of the Pardo [Multirracial] Infantry Regiment of the Merida, Yucatan Militia; 1767
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tilanus Commodor
NE Commander
NE Commander


Joined: 03 Apr 2007
Posts: 5074
Location: Berlin, Germany

PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2017 12:25 pm    Post subject:

Wow, man! King Green!

Crazy, nice post! crazy


General Ricardos wrote:
in the long term (in another 10 years I suppose lol ), right?

Hammer

Good catch, good catch. Devil

General Ricardos wrote:
And there is an intention to reduce the current focus on the time of (early) American conquest and the Reformation, and make it look like they can advance towards the Napoleonic Wars time as they age up instead of being still stuck fighting with swords, pikes and plate armor while building trains and factories. With the idea of maybe in the far, far future having a full blown campaign set around the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars where the Spanish are a playable faction.


That's quite the intention, yes. Smile From the colonialization period up to the Napoleonic Wars and an excursion into the latin american revolutions. But with the ongoing struggle of releasing new NE versions I think I can say with certainity that there will be no campaign.

General Ricardos wrote:
I presume that part of the reason they were put in the backburner is because the team is mostly German and there was trouble finding information on Spanish units. If that's the case, this post should be of help.

Haha, no being illiterate Germans is not the reason Mr. Green The reason is that Napoleonic Era has been for very long a pure expansion mod that didn't touch the original civs (with the exception of adding some units and techs). I've accumulated tons of references over the years, so finding sources was never an issue. Wink

But, I gotta say I love how much care you put into setting this up this way, props for that! I will put a big fat link to this thread in my concept for Spain. Cool

I'll need to look more closely on your comments later on, cause I lack the time right now. Coming back to this!

Edit: One thing that hit my mind though is that I'd appreciate the Spanish original names as well, since - whenever feasible - I prefer using native names over the English ones.
_________________
Napoleonic Era Project Leader


** Support me to support NE **

Test your Age of Empires knowledge in my
Grand Age of Empires quiz! King Green!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
The last Austriahungarian
Continental Marine
Continental Marine


Joined: 01 Feb 2016
Posts: 159
Location: Brasil

PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2017 2:14 pm    Post subject:

could the Santa Hermandad become a uu? Razz
_________________
A KING MUST BE GREEDIER!
A KING MUST LAUGH LOUDER!
A KING MUST BE MORE FURIOUS THAN EVERYONE ELSE!
HE MUST EXEMPLIFY THE EXTREME OF ALL THINGS, GOOD AND EVIL!
THAT IS WHY HIS RETAINERS ENVY AND ADORE HIM, AND WHY THE FLAMES OF ASPIRATION, TO BE AS THE KING IS, CAN BURN WITHIN
HIS PEOPLE!

I SHALL GRIEVE AND I SHALL WEEP, BUT I SHALL NEVER REGRET!
-Iskandar, king of conquerors.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2017 8:18 pm    Post subject:

Thanks both for replying and glad you liked it.

Quote:
Edit: One thing that hit my mind though is that I'd appreciate the Spanish original names as well, since - whenever feasible - I prefer using native names over the English ones.


I'm not gonna lie, I'm making this in part as an English exercise. But if you want the Spanish name of any unit just tell me what and I'll write it here.

Quote:
could the Santa Hermandad become a uu? Razz


I feel they have to be in the game somehow. But I'd like something more special than just another unit. Like a special shipment or technology. Possibilities I thought:

Option 1: Hermandad as unique minutemen
Spanish are like Asians. Instead of calling up just Minutemen, they can call both Minutemen (in place of Irregulars, as stand ins for the historical Acostamientos and Milicias) and Cuadrilleros (in place of Sentries, as stand ins for the Hermandad).

Option 2: The Hermandad as unique home card / technology
A home card (or Church technology) called Santa Hermandad removes the diminishing hitpoints of the Minutemen. Simbolizes the Hermandad being a permanent force unlike the Militias.

Option 3: The Hermandad as unique shipment
My ideal option. You have a home card called Santa Hermandad, available since the Discovery Age, that ships you a mix of archaic units in the manner of a Chinese banner army.

It can be sent only once, but the more you wait, the more guys you get e.g. If you use it in Discovery you get 3 men, and if you use it in Imperial you get 30 (random numbers just to get the point). These guys are mostly Archaic units (pikemen, crossbowmen, and/or rodeleros, with musketeers and light cavalry added after Colonial), so they aren't a game breaker in late game either. Unlike their normal counterparts, they wear white tunics with crosses and have additional attack against treasure guardians. Since this overlaps with the role of the war dogs in the original game, the maximum number of war dogs created by the Spanish explorer is decreased. This way, you can choose different strategies:

- Hit early, get a few men, use them to help the explorer collect treasure and harass the enemy's settlers when you find them (but you won't have enough strength to actually defeat it)

- Hit later, get more men, add them to your army as cannon fodder and sent all to attack. Or sent your real army while you use the Hermandad to garrison your base while they are away.

- Hold until you have the enemy at home and no resources to create a better army, hit then the button and get something that is better than settlers to fight them off, but not much, and pray that it gets the enemy off your back

Keep in mind: It is both historically accurate and in keeping with the original game's developers if you make the Spanish overpowered in the first ages and overtaken by the rest from the Fortress Age on. So don't feel bad about giving them early perks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 5:18 pm    Post subject:

The Imperial Age, Part I:

Quote:

The reign of Charles IV; 1788-1808

During this reign there were many changes in the uniforms and equipment of our soldiers.

- 1785: The officers rifle and strapping is abolished, leaving the sword as their only weapon. Later it would be changed by the sabre, more comfortable and useful.

- 1791: A new uniform is approved introducing the lapels inside the dress coats and ankled boots of black cloth, leaving the ankled boots of white linen to ceremonies. The undershirt and breeches [are] always in the dress coat's color, with only some regiments as exceptions.

- 1793: The troops get a brown campaign uniform, the round hat with the left wing upwards as headwear and both the curls and hair powder are abolished, having to wear it short and with sideburns.

- 1797: The former white uniform with high collar returns, straight and open on the front but a little shorter. The tricorne returns as headwear. The powdered hair [also] returns but the sideburns are kept. The brown uniforms are kept in the regiments tasked to siege Gibraltar.

- 1800: New white uniform with lapers and a high mitre as headwear, lined in the undershirt's color and with a shield with the royal arms on the front. The front piece is topped by a pompom with flame [?]

- 1802: New sky blue uniforms with black undershirt and bright red in all regiments. The chosen headwear is the bicorne with red plume.

- 1805: A new white uniform is chosen and with a different undershirt in each regiment. This is the uniform at the start of the Peninsular War in 1808.

Spoiler:


- Company of Artillery Hunters of the Royal Guard; 1793
- Companies of Artillery Hunters; 1800
- Grenadier of the Royal Walloon Guards
- Captain General
- Hussar of the Admiral's Guard; 1800-1805
- Mobile Artillery Brigade of the Royal Guardias de Corps; 1797
- Officer of the Royal Engineer Corps
- Artillerymen of the Royal Artillery Corps; 1806


The "Mobile Artillery Brigade" (Brigada de Artillería Volante) was a new Horse Artillery corps that was also tasked in putting out wildfires and helping civilian population in similar disasters, like modern military relief services.

Source: http://www.belt.es/expertos/HOME2_experto.asp?id=5433 (some interesting claims here, may also translate this later)

Quote:

Spoiler:


- King's Dragoons Regiment; 1796
- Line Cavalry Regiment "Alrgarve"; 1793
- Line Cavalry soldier; 1802-1805
- Spanish Hussars; 1800-1802
- Hospital Medic; 1793
- Hunters Regiment of the Volunteer Cavalry of Spain; 1787
- Regiment of Cavalry Hunters "Olivença"; 1802

Spoiler:


- Majorca Line Infantry Regiment; 1792
- Toledo Line Infantry Regiment; 1793-1797
- Granada Line Infantry Regiment; 1801-1802
- Line Infantry fusilier; 1802-1805
- First Regiment of Catalonian Light Infantry Volunteers; 1789
- Second Regiment of Catalonian Light Infantry Volunteers; 1800
- Light Infantry; 1802
- Light Infantry officer in leave uniform; 1807

Spoiler:


- Royal Guardias de Corps: Italian Company
- Royal Halberdier Guards Corps
- Fusilier of the Royal Walloon Guards
- Lieutenant General in dress uniform
- Captain of the Royal Engineer Corps
- First Miner [Mining Engineer] in parade uniform, of the Regiment of Miner Sappers.
- Grenadier of the Guadalajara Line Infantry Regiment.

Spoiler:


- Fusilier of the Irish Regiment "Ireland".
- Fusiliers Sergeant of the Light Infantry Regiment "Volunteers of Gerona".
- Drummer of the Malaga Line Infantry Regiment.
- Horse Artillery Officer.

Spoiler:


- Officer of the Spanish Hussars Regiment
- Hunter of the Mounted Hunters Regiment "Volunteers of Spain"; 1807
- Standard bearer of the Lusitania Dragoons
- Trumpet of the Pavia Dragoons
- Line Cavalry Regiment "Algarve"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:08 pm    Post subject:

The Imperial Age, Part II:

Individual soldiers closeups of the reign of Charles IV

Quote:
Spoiler:


Fusilier of the Toledo Line Infantry Regiment; 1800

Spoiler:


Army superintendent; 1800

Spoiler:


Manager / Supervisor ("Contador") of the Artillery's "Sums and Reason" (Cuentas y Razón) Department; 1800


These would check the munitions and materials used by the artillery and order supplies from the factories. Source: http://losejercitosdelrey.es/1802-cuerpo-de-cuenta-y-razon-de-artilleria/] (another great site and source of units and uniforms)

Quote:
Spoiler:


Drummer of the Extremadura Regiment; 1801

Spoiler:


Almansa Dragoons Regiment, 1801

Spoiler:


Main [First?] Drummer of the Zamora Infantry Regiment Number 5; 1802

Spoiler:


Student at the Royal Academy of Engineers in Alcalá de Henares; 1802

Spoiler:


Captain of (Able) Disabled; 1802

Spoiler:


Fusilier of the "Infante" Line Infantry Regiment; 1803

Spoiler:


Hussar of [Queen] María Luisa's Regiment Number 5; 1803

Spoiler:


Hunters Trumpeteer of the Villaviciosa Regiment, Delite Company (Carbineers); 1803

Spoiler:


Soldier of the King's Cavalry Regiment; 1804

Spoiler:


Soldier of the Numancia Dragoons Regiment; 1805

Spoiler:


Field Marshall, Lieutenant General and Brigadier (Brigade General); 1805

Spoiler:


Sapper in campaign uniform, 1805

Spoiler:


Sergeant of the Royal Regiment of Sappers-Miners; 1806

Spoiler:


Artilleryman of the Royal Artillery Corps; 1806

Spoiler:


Officer of the Spanish Hussars Regiment; 1807

Spoiler:


Standard-bearer of the Lusitania Dragoons Regiment; 1807

Spoiler:


Mobile Artillery of the Royal Guardias de Corps; 1807

Spoiler:


Drummer of the Royal Regiment of Sappers-Miners; 1807

Spoiler:


Light Squadron of the Royal Guard's Carbineers Brigade

Spoiler:


Heavy Squadron of the same division

Spoiler:


Light Infantry of the Barbastro 2nd Regiment, before (right) and after 1805 (left)

Spoiler:


Marine Infantry, 2nd Regiment of Catalonia
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
The Navigator Prince
Austrian Line Infantry
Austrian Line Infantry


Joined: 12 Jul 2016
Posts: 75
Location: Porto - "a Cidade Invicta", Portugal

PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:50 pm    Post subject:

Uau!!

This is a great work of organization and research. Congrats!
It would be nice that some of this units come to be in the mod when it's ready, or at least some of this names and concepts which are really cool.

It is a good thing to strengthen the Spanish hordes so that it will be even more fun to defeat the Arch-rivals of my Lusitanic devils.
MUAHAHAHAHA Devil


...or be crushed by them trying lol
_________________
"Não há derrotas quando é firme o passo. Ninguém fala em perder, ninguém recua."
"There are no defeats when you walk firm. No one speaks about loosing, no one goes back."

-From the Poem "Aleluia", of Pedro Homem de Mello; André Villas-Boas speech, 2011 | FC Porto



FC Porto's Official Site: www.FCPorto.pt/en
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 8:05 pm    Post subject:

Muito obrigado! I'm so not surprised that the resident Portuguese popped up after posting units from the War of the Oranges! lol
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
The Navigator Prince
Austrian Line Infantry
Austrian Line Infantry


Joined: 12 Jul 2016
Posts: 75
Location: Porto - "a Cidade Invicta", Portugal

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 2:23 pm    Post subject:

Ahahahahahahah good shot Spaniard

Relax now cuz one day ides pagar as vacas ao dono for that evil


Man, now for real, cool stuff that you posted!
_________________
"Não há derrotas quando é firme o passo. Ninguém fala em perder, ninguém recua."
"There are no defeats when you walk firm. No one speaks about loosing, no one goes back."

-From the Poem "Aleluia", of Pedro Homem de Mello; André Villas-Boas speech, 2011 | FC Porto



FC Porto's Official Site: www.FCPorto.pt/en
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tilanus Commodor
NE Commander
NE Commander


Joined: 03 Apr 2007
Posts: 5074
Location: Berlin, Germany

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:30 pm    Post subject:

So much love <3

Thanks a lot for your input, guys! Thread is already saved, so I'll revisit it when Spain's on my plate again. Cool
_________________
Napoleonic Era Project Leader


** Support me to support NE **

Test your Age of Empires knowledge in my
Grand Age of Empires quiz! King Green!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
General Ricardos
French Conscript
French Conscript


Joined: 23 Dec 2017
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:41 am    Post subject:

Excelent! Wink

The Imperial Age, Part III:

Quote:

The Peninsular War; 1808-1814

In this time the uniforms suffered the ravages of war, and due to the loss of the supply depots every Junta [local provisional governments], every Regiment, every Militia, every Unit had to survive as it could. [...] Although there were attempts to maintain rules for uniforms in the regular regiments, the uniforms had notable differences because of the different origins and cloth used. Besides, when the war broke out many people were recruited to face the vast French enemy and there was no time to wait for uniforms, so the troops were "uniformed" in whatever was available and it was more common that each regiment dressed in the traditional clothing of their region than with those typical of their weapon or corps.

In general, we could say that the straight pants replaced the breeches, [and] the shako, be it in English or French style, replaced the bicorne, which was relegated to the officers [...] The top hat, round and with short wing, was also very common, as was the traditional clothing of each province.

Spoiler:


- Fusilier of the Medinasidonia Regiment; 1813
- Fusilier of the Castropol Regiment; 1809
- Officer of the Madrid Cavalry Hunters; 1811
- Cádiz Distinguished Volunteers; 1810
- Navarrese volunteer; 1808

Spoiler:


- Officer of the Queen's Regiment in campaign uniform; 1810
- Second Battalion of Guipuzcoan Volunteers; 1810
- Baza Regiment; 1812
- Saint Andrew's Hussars Squadron; 1812
- Valencian volunteer; 1808
- Almogávares Battalion; 1810
- Officer of Don Julián Sánchez's Guerrilla; 1809

Spoiler:


Almogávares Battalion closeup; 1810


The Almogávares or Almogàvers in Catalan (singular Almogávar/Almogàver) were an elite shock infantry troop in Medieval Spain. They originated in the Crown of Aragon and were more often employed there but there were also Almogávares corps in Navarre and Castile in different times. The Catalan Company that fought in the Mediterranean and against the Turks in Byzantium also included Almogávares. They should have been AoK's Spanish UU instead of Conquistadors but whatevs.

Since all of that is well before NE’s timeframe it is pointless to say more about the original Almogávares, but the case is, the name stuck. It was briefly revived by a local militia in the Catalan Revolt of 1640, and again in 1808 by these guys above. These Almogávares were a locally raised guerrilla army that fought against the French in the Ampurdá region of NE Catalonia, directly threatening the French supply line to Barcelona. They were so successful that they gave birth to the rhythm, "Ara venen els d’en Gay, que sempre guanyen i no perden mai" (“Now come Gay’s guys, who always win and never lose”). It's Gay's guys because the guerrilla was created and led by a guy named Narcís Gay. Yes.

First time I saw a picture I figured that they would be some sapper or engineer corps and that they used the axes to clear terrain and build structures but… this doesn’t seem to be the case. i.e. That ax is a Napoleonic Era battlefield weapon.

The guerrilla of Julián Sánchez aka El Charro was made of volunteer cavalry lancers but operated more like an army and fought together with the British. Here is a couple more images:

Spoiler:





Quote:

Spoiler:


- Grenadier of the Guadalajara Line Infantry Regiment; 1808

Spoiler:





- Soldiers of the Death Regiment; 1808


The "Death Regiment" (Regimiento de la Muerte) was made by soldiers who deserted from La Romana's army in Denmark after the people of Madrid revolted against the French. They were returned to Spain by the Royal Navy and were equipped with British weapons and uniforms.

So... an Imperial shipment of British rifflemen?

Quote:
Spoiler:


Drummer of the Malaga Line Infantry Regiment; 1808

Spoiler:


Officer of the Number 29 Line Infantry Regiment "Constitución"; 1812

Spoiler:


Fusilier of the Medina Sidonia Regiment; 1813

Spoiler:


King's Line Cavalry Regiment; 1808

Spoiler:


Infante's Line Cavalry Regiment; 1808

Spoiler:


Cavalry Regiment of Volunteers of the State; 1808

Spoiler:


Standard-bearer of the Villaviciosa Dragoons Regiment; 1808

Spoiler:


Captain and Colonel of the Royal Engineer Corps; 1808

Spoiler:


Spanish artillerymen; 1808

Spoiler:


Captain General in dress uniform; 1808

Spoiler:


Cavalry Hunters

Spoiler:


Dragoons (Almansa Regiment, 1809 in the middle)

Spoiler:




Spanish Hussars (María Luisa's Hussars before March 1809; 1st and 2nd Extremadura Hussars after)

Spoiler:


Line Infantry sappers

Spoiler:


Line Infantry grenadiers

Spoiler:


Foreign Line Infantry Regiment Hibernia (Irish)

Spoiler:


Foreign Line Infantry Regiment (Swiss)

Burgos Regiment, Provincial Militia, 1809:
Spoiler:


Spoiler:


All provincial militia units wore the same uniform: white cloth with bright red cuffs, underside and tails. The buttons had the name of the province inscribed. This figure is a second lieutenant in service uniform, as shown by the gorget. On the side he carries the ordinance sabre, longer and straighter than the one used by the infantry.

Spoiler:


Fusiliers sergeant of the same regiment. [...] He wears a bicorne, in the style used before the war, and leggins over the ordinance shoes. On the side he wears the bayonet and his infantry sabre.

Spoiler:


Grenadier of the provincial militia units, wearing the characteristic bearskin shako. The shako is different from grenadiers of the line units: it is lower, without decoration in the backside and no [decorative] grenade, but two golden cords instead.



Spoiler:


Officer of the Queen's Line Infantry Regiment; 1810

Spoiler:


Officer of the Canary Islands Infantry Battalion; 1810

Spoiler:


Toledo Regiment soldier; 1811

Spoiler:


Spanish Lancers officer; 1811

Spoiler:


Extremaduran Legion lancer; 1811

Spoiler:


La Mancha 7th Regiment of Lancers; 1812

Spoiler:


Artillery soldier in campaign uniform

Spoiler:


Artillery lieutenant in winter uniform [uniform adopted in 1805 and used through the war, I missed to post it earlier]

Spoiler:


Horse Artillery officer


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum Index -> NE Forum All times are GMT
Go to page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group | Page design by Tilanus Commodor & michfrm.