Spanish units and uniforms 1470-1840 and related musings
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General Ricardos
French Conscript
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Joined: 23 Dec 2017
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 1:16 am    Post subject:

Found another image of a Dragoon with his gun on his hand instead of the side sabre:

Spoiler:

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 7:21 am    Post subject:

Is this site alive again!?
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2018 7:03 pm    Post subject:

New Year Magic! Devil
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 5:46 am    Post subject:

The Imperial Age, Part IV (mostly):

Spanish Minutemen and Revolutionaries... Part I

The Spanish guerrilleros (please be sure to spell it correctly) played a part in the Peninsular War on par with regular units, if not even more important. Naturally they are referenced on the original post, although briefly, and excluding the first image, the pictures are quite bad. (BTW, Skirmishers are translated as "Guerrilleros" in the Spanish version, so this will be a problem when the time will come to translate NE).

Spoiler:

Quote:

The guerrilleros were an unvaluable part in the victory of the Spanish over the French[.] Although they can't be classified in uniformology terms, one can form an idea of how they dressed indeed, although we must remember that some guerrilla parties worked like a true army and managed to develop [their own] uniforms.




[Guerrilla in El Empecinado's gang]


[Guerrilla in Julián Sánchez's gang]


[Juan Martín Díez,] El Empecinado
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Mart%C3%ADn_D%C3%ADez



I believe the first one is Aragonese, although he's rather iconic/typical and could be from anywhere.

After considering several scenarios I think the best one would be something like this:

Uniquely for Europeans, the Spanish have access to the equivalent of the Asian Irregulars + Sentries combo, instead of Minutemen

I suggested it earlier as a possible way to bring the Santa Hermandad into the game, but I think it works far, far better as a way to reference the popular uprisings of the Peninsular War. After all, the Hermandad was a permanent force in rural areas while the insurgents would rise fast in urban areas during times of desperation and burn out just as quickly, hence the loss of health points and the need to keep them around the town center (this wouldn't be just a PW phenomenon as it would also stand for people taking up arms against pirate raids or revolts). Like the Asians, these Sentries and Irregulars would have less HP than Minutemen to balance the anti-cavalry bonus of the Sentries.

The Spanish version of the Sentry, the Paisano:

"Paisano" is an old-fashioned term meaning "countryman". It pops constantly in historical literature to name civilians, irregulars and volunteers; before, during and after the Peninsular War.

This is the game's version of the raw, sudden, pure anger-fueled protagonists of the May 2 and similar uprisings. Unlike the Asian sentries, he is armed with only one, big knife, like Spies and NE Inquisitors (a joke unit that should go out BTW). The knife is a Spanish folding knife called navaja. The Paisano may be confused with a Guerrillero, but unlike the Guerrillero, who is largely of rural extraction and active in the countryside, the Paisano is not taking part in battles outside town as he symbolizes the poor urban class. He's simply killing enemies in his home town until he is put down, with the only thing he has at hand, the knife he uses to cut his food and any random shit. His strength is the quickness with which he is trained (since nobody trained him) and his fast feet. And his bonus against cavalry is well deserved:

Spoiler:








(a rural peasant uprising for comparison [Valdepeñas] notice the guns)



His only protection, if any, is a cape worn on the left arm to help deflect sword and bayonet blows, loosely mirroring a bullfighter's cape. This was rooted in hand to hand combat manuals going back to the 1500s or earlier. The cape and knife (the rich used guns and swords) was such a staple of urban crime that the government tried to curtail or prohibit them several times without success, and in some cases triggered or helped trigger revolts like the Esquilache Riot of 1766. You may find images of rioteers from May 2 and after carrying guns along with knives, but in truth the poor urbanites would not have access to guns, unlike the middle classes and rural poor, who used them for hunting. The French hated the Navaja so much, they decreed that anyone caught with one would be executed.

Spoiler:


(obviously exagerated weapon)



I don't know if you still plan to make Minutemen upgrade and if that would also apply to Sentries+Irregulars. One way to do it could be to have the base unit without cape and the upgrade with cape:

Paisano Arrow Paisano con capa

If you don't like the "Paisano" name, you could also name it "Majo" (the popular name for a low class Madrilenian at the time), or "Chispero", a resident of Madrid's Malasaña neighborhood where Juan Malasaña and his family (second painting) lived. But that would be reducing the scope too much. Alternatively, the "Paisano con capa" could be named "Duelista".

But if you prefer an actual, historical upgrade to the Paisano that happened in real life, you can have the base unit armed with a knife (Navaja) and the upgrade armed with a short spear (Chuzo). Before the war, the Chuzo was part of the apparel of city nightwatchmen (Serenos), and they continued to use them into the 20th century.

Spoiler:





On 12 February 1809, almost a year after the first uprising, a royal decree ordered the Juntas to make, stockpile and distribute chuzos for free among the population.

Thus, Paisano con Navaja Arrow Paisano con Chuzo

Spoiler:


(Actual 1808 chuzo tips in Madrid's National Archaeological Museum)



And for added flavor, if you can and feel like it, you could have some Paisanos randomly generate as Paisanas, i.e. women with navajas and chuzos.

EDIT: There was another colloquial name for the urban low classes in the late 1700s and early 1800s, manolo (from Manuel). The stereotypical manolo dressed in the Spanish way and liked bullfighting and Spanish music in contrast to the stereotypical urban middle class petimetre (from French Petit Maitre), who followed French fashions. However both manolo and petimetre sound a little ridiculous to modern Spanish ears.
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