Languages, Words and Letters
Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 165, 166, 167
 
   Forum Index -> Off Topic
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
SAOL
Emperor
Emperor


Joined: 14 Sep 2008
Posts: 23251
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Sun Jan 18, 2015 10:29 am    Post subject:

Quote:
In case of pronouns jemu/mu and jego (niego)/go, this is a rule both in speech and writing. A native speaker of Polish will never make a mistake.
Never? lol Come on. Shit happens.

Contractions should obviously be more common in spoken language. There's no point in using them if they complicate things further.
_________________
Join
WWLLUASCLWPJ
We Who Loathe Long or Unnecessary Abbreviations and Similar Clusters of Letters Without Proper Justification

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Skype Name
Wojtek
Totenkopfhusar
Totenkopfhusar


Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 579
Location: Szczecin, zachodniopomorskie, Poland

PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 6:31 pm    Post subject:

I think that the most common ones are less likely to be misused, that's why making a mistake when using jemu/mu is almost impossible. In case of dlań, weń etc. people who use it to sound posh and styligh often make mistakes because they don't know how to use them properly.
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wojtek
Totenkopfhusar
Totenkopfhusar


Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 579
Location: Szczecin, zachodniopomorskie, Poland

PostPosted: Sat Jan 31, 2015 10:10 pm    Post subject:

At last I managed to upload a sample of my favourite dialect of Polish. It's spoken by Poles living around Vilnius (Lithuania). Guess what happened in the video. Confused
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EYVdXmspes
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SAOL
Emperor
Emperor


Joined: 14 Sep 2008
Posts: 23251
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2015 6:00 pm    Post subject:

I simply can't learn to appreciate how Polish sounds, it seems. It's just awful Topmodel

They don't seem like a very happy family. I guess she was locked in the Sauna as some form of punishment?
_________________
Join
WWLLUASCLWPJ
We Who Loathe Long or Unnecessary Abbreviations and Similar Clusters of Letters Without Proper Justification

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Skype Name
Wojtek
Totenkopfhusar
Totenkopfhusar


Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 579
Location: Szczecin, zachodniopomorskie, Poland

PostPosted: Mon Feb 02, 2015 9:17 pm    Post subject:

SAOL wrote:
I simply can't learn to appreciate how Polish sounds, it seems. It's just awful Topmodel

They don't seem like a very happy family. I guess she was locked in the Sauna as some form of punishment?
You're simply not exposed to the language on a regular basis. And the teenage girl was locked in the basement because she refused to eat breakfast but in a very rude manner which made the woman upset.
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SAOL
Emperor
Emperor


Joined: 14 Sep 2008
Posts: 23251
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Tue Feb 03, 2015 7:52 pm    Post subject:

Perhaps not, but I spent the entire morning today listening to a conversation in Polish - a close classmate of mine is Polish - and trying to decipher what was being said mostly through facial expressions and hand movements.

On the other hand I roughly knew what the conversation was supposed to be about, so I just smiled and nodded at what seemed like appropriate moments lol
_________________
Join
WWLLUASCLWPJ
We Who Loathe Long or Unnecessary Abbreviations and Similar Clusters of Letters Without Proper Justification

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Skype Name
Wojtek
Totenkopfhusar
Totenkopfhusar


Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 579
Location: Szczecin, zachodniopomorskie, Poland

PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2015 10:56 pm    Post subject:

I really love cognates and comparing them, especially when languages are similar and I can speculate as how and why some words are alike but some different. Here's a list of Polish and Russian names of parts of the body with English translations. I used Polish spelling for Russian transliteration.

Polish - Russian - English

czoło - łob - forehead

nos - nos - nose

oko/oczy - głaz/głaza - eye/eyes

brew/brwi - brow'/browi - eyebrow/eyebrows

rzęsa/rzęsy - riesnica/riesnicy - eyelash/eyelashes

powieka/powieki - wieko/wieki - eyelid/eyelids

polik/poliki - szczeka/szczeki - cheek/cheeks

ucho/uszy - ucho/uszi - ear/ears

podbródek - podborodok - chin

szczęka - czieliust' - jaw

wargi - guby - lips

kość - kost' - bone

skóra - koża - skin

krew - krow' - blood

szyja - szeja - neck

głowa - gołowa - head

włosy - wołosy - hair

ręka/ręce - ruka/ruki - arm/arms

dłoń - ładoń - palm

palec - paliec - finger

łokieć - łokot' - elbow

brzuch - żiwot - stomach

noga/nogi - noga/nogi - leg/legs

stopa/stopy - stopa/stopy - foot/feet

pięta/pięty - piata/piaty - heel/heels

kolano/kolana - kolieno/koliena - knee/knees

łydka - ikra - calf

kręgosłup - spina - spine

biodro - biedro - hip

ząb/zęby - zub/zuby - tooth/teeth

język - jazyk - tongue

dziąsło - diesna - gum

kostka - kostoczka - ankle

podeszwa - podoszwa - sole

udo - biedro - thigh

żołądek - żełudok - maw (stomach)

nerki - poczki - kidneys

jelita, kiszki - kiszki - intestines, bowels

płuca - liogkije - lungs

serce - sierdce - heart

tętnica - artierija - artery

żyła - żiła - vine

nadgarstek - zapiast'je - wrist

obojczyk - kliuczica - collarbone

gardło - gorło - throat

przełyk - piszczewod - oesophagus

tchawica - trachieja - trachea

oskrzele - bronch - bronchus

wątroba - pieczień - liver

trzustka - podżełudocznaja żelieza - pancreas

miednica - taz - pelvis


I've listed too many of them but there are more and more of them but it would take ages for me to mention all of them. lol
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SAOL
Emperor
Emperor


Joined: 14 Sep 2008
Posts: 23251
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 4:01 pm    Post subject:

It makes rational sense that common, necessary words, that must have existed more or less since the dawn of language would be more wide spread and similar between languages. And I suppose that's often true.

Since the world is so interconnected nowadays it also makes sense that new words are more similar between languages than ever before. I think that's an interesting thought.

So... a long list of anatomical words. Here's something I'm curious about (and anyone is welcome to answer for their language): How do you deal with anatomical Latin?
_________________
Join
WWLLUASCLWPJ
We Who Loathe Long or Unnecessary Abbreviations and Similar Clusters of Letters Without Proper Justification

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Skype Name
Wojtek
Totenkopfhusar
Totenkopfhusar


Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 579
Location: Szczecin, zachodniopomorskie, Poland

PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 7:53 pm    Post subject:

As a native speaker of Polish I find leaerning Latin or even English medical terms extremely difficult. The vast majority of Polish medical terms are native words. When I want to talk about medical conditions or illnesses in English and I don't know the English term, I usually start describing the symptoms or the overall condition of the ill because the Polish term is totally different and of no help. I watched a documentary about a disease, which in Polish is called wścieklizna, but I forgot the English term. After asking Google Translate for help, which I did a moment ago, I found out it was rabies. It's the same with many different diseases. Of course I know the basic ones like: 'flu, pneumonia, cold, bronchitis, measles, food poisoning etc., but the names of diseases I don't use very often speaking English are usually unknown to me. I believe that people who study medicine are exposed to medical English on a regular basis and they know a lot more.
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SAOL
Emperor
Emperor


Joined: 14 Sep 2008
Posts: 23251
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 12:51 pm    Post subject:

Of course those who study medicine become more familiar with English names of anatomy and diseases, especially those who belong to a smaller language. The number of textbooks in those languages is much smaller. That's not only true for medicine, but for more or less every scientific subject.

I was more curious how Latin is used to describe anatomy. For instance, would you say musculus pterygoideus lateralis or some more localized form like the English lateral pteregoid muscle (or something along those lines)?
_________________
Join
WWLLUASCLWPJ
We Who Loathe Long or Unnecessary Abbreviations and Similar Clusters of Letters Without Proper Justification

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Skype Name
Wojtek
Totenkopfhusar
Totenkopfhusar


Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 579
Location: Szczecin, zachodniopomorskie, Poland

PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 12:33 pm    Post subject:

I'm a student of medicine so I don't really know how it should work. Personally I opt for localized names because I don't think regular people are acquainted with Latin and expecting from common people to understand Latin is silly. As for musculus pterygoideus lateralis, in Polish it is "mięsień skrzydłowy boczny", but it doesn't really tell me much, unless I check it somewhere on the Internet or a book about anatomy.

In my biology books (Yes, I passed biology on my school-ending exam in 2009) I didn't find any instances of this particular muscle. It was literally skipped Rolling Eyes
http://files.tinypic.pl/i/00641/t40y2uc3jhar.jpg

http://files.tinypic.pl/i/00641/4cxg4rwljtrg.jpg

At least now I know this one is used for moving the jaw. I think in Polish medicine the old term 'mięsień policzkowy' (cheek muscle) is used more often. Anyway, having seen pictures of all the muscles and their names and functions I really feel for people who inject botox into thir facial muscles. It's really unwise to paralyse one's face and temporarily disable the natural movements of their muscles only to look like Joker or a clown Rolling Eyes
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SAOL
Emperor
Emperor


Joined: 14 Sep 2008
Posts: 23251
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 6:53 pm    Post subject:

I wouldn't expect of anyone, including myself, to know of that muscle on top of their head. In fact I picked it because I suspect it is a muscle that doesn't have a specific "layman's" name in most languages.

Plus, I figured that for someone who studies language, such as yourself, It could be fun to know the names of some of the muscles which are necessary to move the jaw to form the sounds of language. I know some anatomy of the mouth and upper airways are taught in phonology.

I'm not fond of the Botox look either. Plus, it feels a bit silly to inject such an incredibly potent toxin just to rid yourself of some wrinkles.

Now I think I've figured out what "muscle" is in Polish Wink
_________________
Join
WWLLUASCLWPJ
We Who Loathe Long or Unnecessary Abbreviations and Similar Clusters of Letters Without Proper Justification

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Skype Name
Wojtek
Totenkopfhusar
Totenkopfhusar


Joined: 30 Dec 2009
Posts: 579
Location: Szczecin, zachodniopomorskie, Poland

PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:55 pm    Post subject:

I used to have classes on phonology so I came across some of the names. I don't, however, remember much because I prefer a practical approach to learning and thus practical classes were more useful for me than lectures or theory in general. I have an impression that in majority of Indo-European languages the word 'muscle' is similar, starts with letter m and is related to meat in general.

In Polish:
muscle - mięsień
meat - mięso

In Russian:
muscle - мышца (myszca)
meat - мясо (miaso)
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SAOL
Emperor
Emperor


Joined: 14 Sep 2008
Posts: 23251
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 6:57 am    Post subject:

It's muskel in Swedish.

Meat, however, is the completely unrelated kött. That's the same in all Scandinavian languages.
_________________
Join
WWLLUASCLWPJ
We Who Loathe Long or Unnecessary Abbreviations and Similar Clusters of Letters Without Proper Justification

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Skype Name
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Off Topic All times are GMT
Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 165, 166, 167
Page 167 of 167

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group | Page design by Tilanus Commodor & michfrm.